Susan Collins Wins in Maine, Denying Democrats a Crucial Senate Pickup

first_imgThe pandemic offered an opportunity for Ms. Collins to counter the narrative by highlighting her work with Democrats, as she championed what would become a popular federal loan program to stabilize thousands of small businesses across the country in the $2.2 trillion stimulus law enacted in the spring. The creation of the Paycheck Protection Program, along with a series of measures to overhaul and replenish it, also allowed Ms. Collins to draw a sharp contrast with Ms. Gideon, who adjourned the state’s legislature in March and failed to secure bipartisan support to reconvene it.In the days leading up to Tuesday’s election, Ms. Collins crisscrossed the state in her campaign bus, visiting small businesses that survived the pandemic by taking advantage of the loan program and Maine towns that had benefited from her work on the Senate Appropriations Committee. But ultimately, to a soundtrack of “Still the One” by Orleans and “I’m Still Standing” by Elton John blaring in the snowy hotel parking lot, it was Ms. Collins who prevailed. Ms. Collins, 67, who had trailed in most public polling this year, overcame the liberal groundswell in part by centering her campaign on local issues and distancing herself from Mr. Trump, even declining to say whether she would vote for him.Toiling to preserve an image she has carefully cultivated as an independent-minded moderate, she reminded voters of her accomplishments for the state and emphasized her likely ascendance to the helm of the powerful Appropriations Committee, which allocates federal spending, should Republicans keep the majority, as well as her personal relationships in the state. National Democrats, furious after Ms. Collins became a key vote in support of Mr. Trump’s tax plan and the confirmation of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court in 2018, had singled out Ms. Collins as a top target on their path to reclaiming the Senate majority. As a result, the race had become the most expensive in Maine history, with national donors flooding the state with tens of millions of dollars and an onslaught of negative campaign ads.Ms. Gideon, the speaker of Maine’s House, had sought to frame the campaign as a referendum on Republicans, painting Ms. Collins as out of touch with the state and in lock-step with Mr. Trump and Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader. She capitalized on the growing polarization of the state in the Trump era, as Democrats and independent voters became increasingly frustrated with Ms. Collins’s pattern of expressing distress at the president’s language and actions, only to side with her party on crucial issues.But Ms. Gideon ultimately fell short, failing to keep Ms. Collins from attaining the 50 percent threshold required for outright victory under the state’s ranked choice voting system. Republicans had feared that the system could harm her chances, potentially consolidating liberal opposition to her given the presence in the race of a progressive, Lisa Savage, who had openly encouraged her supporters to list Ms. Gideon as their second choice.- Advertisement – “I feel that this is an affirmation of the work that I’m doing in Washington to fight hard every day, to fight hard every day for the people of Maine,” Ms. Collins said to a small crowd of masked supporters cheering in a Hilton Garden Inn parking lot, shortly after Ms. Gideon called her to concede the race. “I will serve you with all my heart, I will work hard for you, each and every day, and together we will come together to work on the problems and challenges that are facing our state and our country.”- Advertisement – “I am taking the same approach that I have always taken,” Ms. Collins told reporters on Wednesday. Earlier in the day, Senator Joe Manchin III, Democrat of West Virginia, called her, she said, seeking a meeting in the coming days to hammer out the persistent impasse over another coronavirus relief package.Ms. Collins, whose vote for Justice Kavanaugh spurred critics to amass nearly $4 million for her eventual opponent, further burnished her credentials as a moderate willing to break with her party when Senate Republicans rushed to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left in September by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.Ms. Collins became one of only two senators in her party to object to moving forward to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett before the election, and the only one to vote “no.” She pointed to her objections after her fellow Republicans stonewalled Judge Merrick B. Garland, President Barack Obama’s pick to succeed Justice Antonin Scalia after his death in 2016, when they insisted such a seat should not be filled in an election year.With Republicans otherwise nearly united on moving forward, they did not need her vote anyway, and the unusual circumstances allowed Ms. Collins, who supports abortion rights, to sidestep the question of whether to confirm a nominee who personally opposed abortion.Democrats scoffed at the vote, arguing that it did little to affect the process and used the vote to try to boost Ms. Gideon’s chances in the final days of the campaign.center_img Updated Nov. 4, 2020, 3:02 p.m. ET BANGOR, Me. — Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, claimed victory on Wednesday in her bid to secure a fifth term, beating back an avalanche of Democratic money and liberal anger in the most difficult race of her career to defeat Sara Gideon, a Democrat, and strengthen the party’s hold on the Senate.Her triumph, reported by The Associated Press, preserved Ms. Collins’s status as the only remaining New England Republican in Congress. She became the first senator in the state’s history to be directly chosen by voters for a fifth term in the upper chamber, dashing Democratic hopes of a crucial pickup as their ambitions of a Senate takeover hung by a thread.- Advertisement – “Mainers rallied around our campaign in a way I’ve never seen before, and while we came up short, I do believe Mainers in every corner of this state are ready to continue to work together to make a difference,” Ms. Gideon said in a somber concession speech. “Regardless of the result, together we built a movement that will help us make progress for years to come.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

Paul Mullin interview: Cambridge striker on idolising Fernando Torres, a Spanish adventure and enjoying football again | Football News

first_img“I look back now with good memories but at the time, it did all go badly as they were in financial trouble. I was grateful to come back home as I was homesick, being a young lad over in Spain. It was quite a relief to come back but looking back it was a shame.”Having missed the deadline to sign a scholarship at an EFL club as a result of his exploits on the continent, ironically, it was the Liverpool FC Foundation Football College that helped Mullin get back on track.“It was a good time that just gave me time to enjoy football and really find where I wanted to play because at Liverpool I was playing out of position and sort of lost what I was. It gave me time to reassure myself that I was a centre forward and enjoy playing football again.”A friendly against Huddersfield piqued the Terriers’ interest, which led to a one-year contract but it was at Morecambe where he began to make a name for himself, missing just 16 fixtures of a possible 138 across three League Two seasons with the Shrimps.Mullin initially joined Cambridge on a six-month loan in January, having made just 17 league starts across two frustrating seasons with Tranmere, and scored twice in six appearances at the beginning of Mark Bonner’s initial spell as caretaker boss. – Advertisement – Mullin has scored 13 goals in just 14 games for Cambridge so far this termImage:Mullin has scored 13 goals in just 14 games for Cambridge so far this term It didn’t take long for him to realise that the Abbey Stadium was where he wanted to write the next chapter of his career.“I went to see the manager [Micky Mellon] with a couple of days left of the window and I said I wanted to get more game time and if he couldn’t guarantee it, I’d like to move on, especially with my contract coming to an end. Micky was sound and said I wasn’t going to play as much as I’d have liked, so he’d let me go. On the last day of the window, Cambridge gave me a ring and I jumped at the chance to go and enjoy football again.“When I first came, the lads were great with me but, more importantly, the manager. He got the way I play and he wanted to play the way I enjoy playing, which played into my hands. Then, come the summer, it was an easy decision for me as I’d been there, knew what it was about and I knew the manager liked me and I really liked him. I think that’s a big thing in the football game really.”Bonner was appointed head coach on a permanent basis on March 9 and in late July, Mullin signed a one-year deal. “I had the option to sign for longer but my decision was more of a family one – I’ve got a little boy back in Liverpool,” he says.In no uncertain terms, Mullin credits Bonner’s trust and support as the most significant factor in what has been a remarkable start to his time as a permanent member of the Cambridge squad. “It was enjoyable and, looking back now, it was an unbelievable experience,” he continues. “The football was different and the lifestyle would’ve been totally different. During the time I was there, we’d train in the evenings, so you’d have the daytime to go to the beach, which was great. “It was a dream to play there and I always hoped there could be a chance I could make the first team. It was quite naïve of me at the time looking back but it was a dream and something I can always tell my son.“When I was younger, Fernando Torres was one of my idols. I used to go to the games every week when he was at Liverpool and watching him play every week was just a joy. I was sitting watching the other day with [Ipswich striker] James Norwood, who I live with and I was reading out every goal as it came on – I’ve memorised them so much!”Upon his eventual release, a 16-year-old Mullin flew to Spain for a trial with Racing Santander, who were in competing in La Liga at the time. After a month on the Cantabrian coastline, however, a combination of factors brought him back to Merseyside.- Advertisement – preview image His journey really could have been so different.“At first I was at Everton and then I left to go to Liverpool,” he explains to Sky Sports. “I’ve always supported them so it was a dream for me.“When you are a kid you think you are going to play for Liverpool but my mum and dad always did try and warn me that things could go wrong. There were times when I could’ve moved on to other clubs before I eventually got released and chose not to against my mum and dad’s advice. Paul Mullin has only played 14 games this season.In those 14 games, however, the Cambridge striker has chalked up an astonishing 13 goals. It’s the best return the 26-year-old has ever posted and the campaign is little more than three months old. There are still 35 league games to play.- Advertisement – Saturday 14th November 2:00pm – Advertisement – “When you are a forward, you are judged on the goals you score,” he adds. “Other times in my career I moved positions to play out wide and was still judged on the goals I scored because I was still classed as a forward player. Since I’ve been here, I’ve had a manager who has really trusted me to play up front.“The gaffer fully trusts me, believes in me and respects what I do. He’s brilliant with me and has really brought us together as a group and stamped down the way he wants us to play. Thankfully we’ve been doing him a favour but he also does us a lot of favours; he takes pressure off us and just outlines what we need to do every week.“Equally important is the fact I’ve got players around me who are creating chances for me and giving me a platform to go and play well and score the goals.”Taking Mullin under his wing might just be the single most important decision Bonner makes all season. 1:37 Highlights of the Sky Bet League Two match between Cambridge and Salford. Gillette Soccer Saturday  Image:The 26-year-old spent two years with Tranmere before his move to the Abbey Stadiumlast_img read more

Agreement reached between EU Member States: Common criteria for labeling regions by number of coronavirus infected defined

first_imgThis is a big step forward, because now the restriction of travel to a country will be transparent and automated, without political “games”, which is a prerequisite for the stability of tourism. That’s right green indicate the country if the 14-day cumulative COVID-19 case reporting rate is less than 25 per 19 thousand population and the COVID-3 infection test positive rate is less than XNUMX%; Based on this information, the ECDC should publish weekly maps of EU Member States with individually identified regions in order to contribute to decision-making in the Member States.  number newly reported cases per 100 inhabitants in the last 000 daysnumber tests conducted in the past week per 100 inhabitants (testing rate) andpercentage positive tests conducted in the past week (rate of positive tests). EU Member States have harmonized common criteria to mark regions by the number of coronavirus infected. Based on the data provided by the Member States to the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control, a map of the EU countries by different colors or zones (green, orange, red, gray) – and by regions, which is crucial. Member States should provide available information on the following criteria to the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) on a weekly basis:center_img It was also agreed that they would notify for the country in which the restricted trip would be announced 48 hours before entry into force new measures, which will give guests plenty of time to organize and return to their country. This year, there were cases when the decisions came into force on the second day, which created confusion for everyone, and especially for tourists. See the Council’s decision HERE Orange will mean if the 14-day cumulative COVID-19 case reporting rate is less than 50 per 19 population, but the COVID-3 infection test positive rate is 14% or more, or if the 19-day cumulative COVID-25 infection rate is cases range from 150 to 19, but the positivity rate of COVID-3 infection tests is less than XNUMX%; Red zone, if the 14-day cumulative COVID-19 case reporting rate is 50 or more and the COVID-19 infection test positive is 3% or more, or if the 14-day cumulative COVID-19 case is more than 150 at 100 inhabitants. Gray areas for which there is insufficient data will be marked. The map of member states by zones and by regions will be visible on the network platform ReOpen-EUlast_img read more

Belgium toughens rules after ‘worrying’ virus surge

first_imgSpecial local measures have been taken to try to contain the spike.But Jacobs warned that “the number of infections is also rising considerably in the rest of the country”.An average of 279 people a day contracted COVID-19 in the last week, compared with 163 a day the week before.”Most infections are still coming among the active population, that is to say people aged between 20 and 59,” Jacobs said.Since the start of the pandemic Belgium has recorded 66,026 cases and 9,821 deaths, according to the latest data published on Monday, making it one of the countries with the highest per capita rates of infection at the height of crisis in Europe.A three-year-old girl with severe pre-existing health problems became Belgium’s youngest known coronavirus victim last week.Tougher rules on wearing masks came into force on Saturday with face coverings made obligatory in markets, hotels and busy shopping streets. The announcement from Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes comes as fears grow in some European countries of a damaging second wave of the pandemic, with Britain reimposing quarantine requirements on holidaymakers returning from Spain.Belgian health officials said there had been a rapid rise in coronavirus cases, with 1,952 new infections over the past week, up more than 70 percent on the previous week.”The epidemiological data are worrying and we are very worried, that’s why we are acting today,” Wilmes told reporters, after a meeting of the country’s national security council.In addition, face masks are to become compulsory whenever people are unable to maintain a social distance of 1.5 meters, and the government is “strongly recommending” that people work from home. The moves mark a sharp turnaround after Belgium began to ease anti-virus measures, but Wilmes said it was needed “to avoid a new complete lockdown and to avoid putting the return of schools in September in jeopardy”.Frederique Jacobs, professor of infectious diseases and a spokeswoman for Belgium’s federal COVID-19 taskforce, told reporters: “The rapid growth in the number of cases is worrying.” She said the situation was particularly serious in the province of Antwerp, in northern Belgium, which recorded 47 percent of new infections in the last week.  Belgium announced new rules Monday as it tries to stem a worrying flare-up in coronavirus cases centered on the port city of Antwerp.From Wednesday, Belgians will be allowed to see a maximum of five people outside of their families, reducing the permitted “social bubble” from 15.Working from home will be “strongly recommended.”center_img Cat sickMeanwhile, travel giant TUI cancelled all British holidays to mainland Spain from Monday after London announced that all travellers returning from the country would have to go into two week’s quarantine.The newly-imposed rule, abruptly introduced at midnight Saturday hours after being announced, follows a surge in coronavirus cases in parts of Spain in recent weeks.The quarantine rule has dismayed the tourism sector, which was aiming to recover some of its revenues during the peak summer weeks after being decimated by months of lockdown.There was further unsettling news from Britain where health officials said a pet cat had become the country’s first animal to be confirmed with COVID-19.The cat was initially diagnosed by a private vet as having the feline herpes virus but the sample was also subsequently tested for COVID-19 and proved positive.Officials said it was a very rare event and there was no evidence that pets transmit the virus directly to humans. Topics :last_img read more

Grand old home to change hands after 90 years

first_imgThe home at 31 Cintra Rd, Bowen Hills.A GRAND Queenslander built by a true gentleman as a wedding gift for his wife-to-be has hit the market for the first time in 90 years.Chivalry certainly wasn’t dead in 1925 when Alexander Burrows set an incredibly high benchmark for the young men of today by building ‘‘Rangeview’’.Little did he know, five generations of his family would enjoy living in the four-bedroom period home at 31 Cintra Rd, Bowen Hills, which has played host to weddings, christenings and even births.Homes with history…Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:25Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:25 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenDream Home: 40 Blackler St, Semaphore00:25 Related videos 00:25Dream Home: 40 Blackler St, Semaphore00:31Historic home for sale01:53Chill out in this underground home00:35Dreamy Victorian Terraces 01:00Historic bluestone cottage in Batesford00:48Art DecoIt will be an emotional day for Alexander Burrows’ granddaughter, Lorraine Firth, when the home goes to auction on July 29.“I have wonderful memories as a teenager at the old home,” Mrs Firth said.“We used to have wonderful parties under the poinciana tree out the back.”Mrs Firth celebrated the best day of her life at the property when she married her husband in the garden 35 years ago.More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019The front entrance of 31 Cintra Road, Bowen Hills.Perched high on an elevated corner, the house sits on an 810sq m block which has two street accesses and is bigger than average for its inner-city location.The home has all the classic features of its time including high ceilings, polished timber floors, intricate lattice timber work and lead-lighting.Marketing agent Brett Greensill of LJ Hooker New Farm said he had never been involved in the sale of a house with such a unique history.“It’s just extraordinary,” he said.“It’s testament to how a home is made as opposed to just selling a house.”Mr Greensill said the home was in the fortunate position of not having any neighbours as it was next to a heritage-listed Catholic Church.The home will be sold with the original title deed.last_img read more

Fab former farmhouse up for auction

first_imgThe outdoor area at 8 Mapleleaf St, Eight Mile Plains.The rumpus room opens through timber and glass doors to the poolside deck. There are also two bedrooms, laundry and powder room on the ground floor. Upstairs, the master bedroom has an ensuite, walk-in wardrobe and built-in wardrobe, and there are two more bedrooms along with a family bathroom. Outside there is a double garage, dual carport, saltwater in-ground pool, and low-maintenance lawns and gardens. The family room at 8 Mapleleaf St, Eight Mile Plains.Marketing agent Peter Florentzos said there was potential to subdivide the property into the three blocks, subject to council approval. The home is going to auction on Saturday, September 9 at 12.30pm. The kitchen and meals area at 8 Mapleleaf St, Eight Mile Plains.“It’s an entertainer’s home as well as a family home,” Mr Pearce said. The home has a living area, family room, modern kitchen and dining room on the ground floor. The kitchen has stone benchtops, Italian hand-pressed tiles, Miele appliances and breakfast bar. The dining room at 8 Mapleleaf St, Eight Mile Plains.“You always get a good breeze,” Mr Pearce said. “The home has character, high ceilings and very solid rendered brick walls.”Since owning the home, the couple have given the property a facelift, painting inside and out, adding a hardwood timber deck, reconfiguring the front entry and adding natural stone paving around the swimming pool. More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020 The home at 8 Mapleleaf St, Eight Mile Plains.THIS renovated family home on a 1661sq m block with subdivision potential is going under the hammer. The five-bedroom family home at 8 Mapleleaf St, Eight Mile Plains, began its life as a 1950s farmhouse. The property was extensively renovated and extended in the 1980s and the current owners, Ian and Sarah Pearce bought the property 10 years ago. Mr Pearce said they loved the size of the home and the position on top of the hill. last_img read more

Romania’s second-pillar funds receive scant contribution increase

first_img“This measure is the biggest blow against the fledgling second-pillar system in its eight-year history,” he told IPE.“We at APAPR made great efforts before the end of 2015 to prevent this and try to convince the government to respect existing legislation, but several populist measures have had more success in making it on the final national budget adopted for 2016.”According to Romania’s Financial Supervisory Authority (ASF), the second pillar had 6.5m members and net assets of RON24.3bn (€5.5bn) as of the end of November 2015, while contributions over the 12-month period totalled RON5.2bn.In related news, the ASF has slashed fees for voluntary third-pillar operations by 50%, cutting the annual asset management fee to 0.01% of net assets, the up-front monthly contribution to 0.25%, and the depositary levy to 5%.These took effect at the start of 2016.The third pillar is considerably smaller than the second, with 378,370 members and net assets of RON.2bn as of the end of November 2015.The fee reductions, however, have also left the industry underwhelmed.Bobocea noted that it fails to compensate for the 2012 decision by the ASF’s predecessor, the Private Pension Supervision Commission (CSSPP), to raise second-pillar fees, as of 2013, by 60%.“That will also have a negligible effect on the financial situation of the industry,” he said.“The APAPR requested a reversal of an exaggerated 60% hike in second-pillar fees in 2012, which still remains a huge burden on the industry.“Basically, the regulator only ‘gave back’ 10% of the requested cut in fees and kept 90%, which is totally unreasonable and unfair.” Romania’s mandatory second-pillar pension funds received scant compensation this year after the government’s 2016 Budget raised the contribution rate by 0.1 percentage point to 5.1% of gross wages, not the 6% earlier stipulated in law.The 6% rate is now set to kick on in 2017.Previous reports suggested the 2016 contribution rate would be frozen at 5%, a measure the Romanian Pension Funds’ Association (APAPR) estimated would cost future pensioners €200m.According to Mihai Bobocea, adviser to the APAPR board, the impact of the so-called “increase” will be negligible.last_img read more

New contract wins for DOF Subsea vessels

first_imgDOF Subsea, a Norwegian offshore vessel operator, has been awarded a frame agreement and several short-term contracts for its vessels. Illustration. One of DOF’s vessels; Photo by Alan JamiesonDOF Subsea said on Friday that the Atlantic region has been awarded a frame agreement for marine subsea services from Wintershall.During the course of this contract, Wintershall may call-of services as required within survey, IMR and light construction using DOF Subsea’s integrated PM&E teams and fleet of subsea vessels. The duration of the agreement is three years firm, with four years of options.In addition, the Atlantic region has been awarded two new contracts for projects in the North Sea from two unnamed clients.Under these contracts, DOF Subsea will carry out environmental survey and subsea inspection work during the third quarter of 2018 utilizing the Skandi Neptune vessel.Built in 2001 and converted in 2005, Skandi Neptune is an ROV construction support vessel, equipped with a heavy duty heave compensated 250 t crane along with two 3 000 m rated WROVs. The vessel is of an MT 6016 design.last_img read more

Saving Presque Isle VIDEO

first_img<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>The USACE Buffalo District’s Presque Isle sand nourishment project’s primary objective is to preserve Presque Isle Peninsula by stabilizing the shoreline and maintaining beaches that are an important economic resource for the City of Erie. Presque Isle Peninsula forms Erie Harbor and is a national landmark.The Buffalo District conducted the annual Presque Isle beach walk at Presque Isle State Park in Erie, PA, April 22, 2020.Data collected on the walk will help determine the scope of the District’s annual sand nourishment project at Presque Isle.last_img

Grant Funding Available for Community Recycling Projects

first_imgStatewide—The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) announced today the availability of grant funding for recycling and household hazardous waste (HHW) collection and disposal from the agency’s Community Recycling Grant Program. “IDEM is pleased to offer grants to communities and organizations that will increase overall recycling in Indiana while helping to protect the environment,” said IDEM Commissioner Bruno Pigott.Counties, municipalities, solid waste management districts, schools, and nonprofit organizations located in Indiana are eligible to submit applications for a Community Recycling Grant under $50,000. Applications are being accepted through Dec. 20, 2019, at 5 p.m. EST.Grants are funded through IDEM’s Solid Waste Management Fund. Eligible projects should focus on education and promotion of recycling, processing of recyclable materials, waste reduction, and HHW and organics management (including yard waste management and composting). Grant funding is intended to create successful, cost-effective programs. Applicants must demonstrate a positive environmental impact within the project service area, an increase in waste diversion as a result of the project, and show the sustainability of the project. Final funding determinations will be made in February 2020.last_img read more