Vancouver International Tap Festival founder says goodbye in style

15 Oct 2019

first_imgWhen the Straight reaches Vancouver International Tap Festival artistic director Sas Selfjord at her home on Gabriola Island, she’s preparing to transport a special goodbye gift for the final rendition of the 18-year-old event. In her back yard sit 14 four-by-eight-foot pieces of birchwood flooring, a perfect, portable dance surface the tap society will be able to use long after her departure.“I’m hauling it over with a truck from Gabriola and then taking it to the [Orpheum] Annex’s stage door on Friday,” she relates, expressing joy that the world-class dancers she’s bringing in won’t have to click their soles on less-than-ideal Masonite. “It’s pristine birchwood—a beautiful honey colour.”The floor is, in many ways, an apt symbol of the professionalism and gleaming artistry she’s been able to build at the festival, known over the years for its range of styles and creations by big names like Michelle Dorrance and Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards. Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement “Tap-dancing is about timing and so is the festival,” explains Selfjord, who will also step down in June 2018 from running the Vancouver Tap Dance Society, centred in the Hastings Sunrise heritage space on East Hastings Street she helped catalyze the group to buy in 2011. “I truly believe the festival in its creative capacity has run its course and we need new roads. Twitterlast_img read more

first_imgWhen the Straight reaches Vancouver International Tap Festival artistic director Sas Selfjord at her home on Gabriola Island, she’s preparing to transport a special goodbye gift for the final rendition of the 18-year-old event. In her back yard sit 14 four-by-eight-foot pieces of birchwood flooring, a perfect, portable dance surface the tap society will be able to use long after her departure.“I’m hauling it over with a truck from Gabriola and then taking it to the [Orpheum] Annex’s stage door on Friday,” she relates, expressing joy that the world-class dancers she’s bringing in won’t have to click their soles on less-than-ideal Masonite. “It’s pristine birchwood—a beautiful honey colour.”The floor is, in many ways, an apt symbol of the professionalism and gleaming artistry she’s been able to build at the festival, known over the years for its range of styles and creations by big names like Michelle Dorrance and Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards. Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement “Tap-dancing is about timing and so is the festival,” explains Selfjord, who will also step down in June 2018 from running the Vancouver Tap Dance Society, centred in the Hastings Sunrise heritage space on East Hastings Street she helped catalyze the group to buy in 2011. “I truly believe the festival in its creative capacity has run its course and we need new roads. Twitterlast_img read more

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HAMILTON BECOMES FIRST MUNICIPALITY LICENSED TO PLAY WITH SOCAN

15 Oct 2019

first_imgHamilton’s vibrant music scene and music-related initiatives have made the city a popular residence for music creators, including SOCAN members, and Hamilton’s SOCAN-licensed recreational facilities set the stage for many private and public events each year where music is heard and performed.“Hamilton is a true playground for music creation, publishing and performance,” said Hamilton-based SOCAN member, Max Kerman, of Arkells. “The SOCAN Licensed To Play designation confirms that Hamilton recognizes the hard work of music creators and publishers, and the importance of venues having a music license. To truly celebrate Canadian culture, it’s important to honour the livelihood of the thousands of songwriters, composers, music publishers, and other musicians living in the area. These administrative steps really add up for someone who works in music.”While Hamilton is home to a diverse community of musicians, it also boasts a growing number of businesses using music as their core offering, or which offer music to improve their business. The City of Hamilton’s Planning & Economic Development Department encourages businesses to use music responsibly by becoming Licensed To Play with SOCAN.“The City of Hamilton believes that musicians and artists are entrepreneurs and being Licensed To Play with SOCAN helps ensure that music creators and publishers are fairly compensated for their hard work. Our Music Strategy and Hamilton Music Advisory Team are focused on cultivating local music creation and talent and encouraging others to support artists via SOCAN licensing and fair payment. A lot of time and effort is invested in the creative process before you listen to the final song,” said Debbie Spence, Business Development Consultant Creative Industries, City of Hamilton.While organizations that use music in their business are expected to abide by the law, constantly monitoring every one of Canada’s music-using businesses isn’t feasible. SOCAN works with businesses and their trade associations, as well as municipalities, to encourage them to stay up-to-date with their music licenses. Collectively, music licensing provides a major part of songwriters’, composers’, and music publishers’ livelihoods through royalties. It’s a vital aspect of Canada’smusic ecosystem.“The City of Hamilton is making a clear statement that it stands up for music rights and the need for songwriters, screen composers, and music publishers to be fairly compensated for their music,” said SOCAN Vice President of Licensing, Leslie Craig. “As the first Canadian city to receive this designation, it’s a milestone for the Hamilton music community, and the more than 150,000 songwriters, composers, and music publishers represented by SOCAN.”Licensed To Play is a long-term program encourages businesses to show that music is an instrumental aspect of the customer experience, and that they stand up for songwriters, screen composers, and music publishers who have created the valuable music that enhances their business.About SOCANSOCAN connects more than four-million music creators worldwide and more than a quarter-million businesses and individuals in Canada. More than 150,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers are its direct members, and more than 100,000 organizations are Licensed To Play music across Canada. With a concerted use of progressive technology and unique data as well as a commitment to lead the global transformation of music rights, with wholly-owned companies Audiam and MediaNet, SOCAN is dedicated to upholding the fundamental truths that music has value and music creators and publishers deserve fair compensation for their work. For more information: www.socan.comAbout the City of HamiltonHamilton is the fifth-largest city in Ontario and the tenth-largest city in Canada. As a global city, Hamilton boasts a renowned education and health sector, as well as a thriving arts scene. Industries in Hamilton include manufacturing, bioscience and medical, and agriculture. The City of Hamilton’s vision is to be the best place to raise a child and age successfully. The City’s mission is to provide high quality cost conscious public services that contribute to a healthy, safe and prosperous community, in a sustainable manner. www.hamilton.ca. Advertisement TORONTO, June 5, 2018 – The City of Hamilton is standing up for fair and legal music licensing for music creators, becoming the first Canadian municipality to receive a special SOCAN Licensed To Play designation.After confirming that all of its city-owned recreational facilities – including community halls, swimming pools, arenas, and other recreational services – are legally licensed by SOCAN to play commercially released music, Hamilton was given a Licensed To Play designation by SOCAN. It includes a Hamilton-specific version of the emblem that more than 40,000 Canadian music-using businesses have so far received to show their support of fair compensation for music creators.“We are proud to be the first Canadian municipality to receive the special Licensed To Play designation from SOCAN. Music is an important aspect of community, culture, and recreation activities, and can bring people from all backgrounds together through special events, festivals, fitness, and dance,” said Laura Kerr, Manager of Program Development, Recreation Division, at the City of Hamilton. Advertisement SOCAN has designated the City of Hamilton as the first Canadian municipality to be Licensed To Play, in support of legal and ethical music rights. (CNW Group/SOCAN) Facebookcenter_img Login/Register With: Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgHamilton’s vibrant music scene and music-related initiatives have made the city a popular residence for music creators, including SOCAN members, and Hamilton’s SOCAN-licensed recreational facilities set the stage for many private and public events each year where music is heard and performed.“Hamilton is a true playground for music creation, publishing and performance,” said Hamilton-based SOCAN member, Max Kerman, of Arkells. “The SOCAN Licensed To Play designation confirms that Hamilton recognizes the hard work of music creators and publishers, and the importance of venues having a music license. To truly celebrate Canadian culture, it’s important to honour the livelihood of the thousands of songwriters, composers, music publishers, and other musicians living in the area. These administrative steps really add up for someone who works in music.”While Hamilton is home to a diverse community of musicians, it also boasts a growing number of businesses using music as their core offering, or which offer music to improve their business. The City of Hamilton’s Planning & Economic Development Department encourages businesses to use music responsibly by becoming Licensed To Play with SOCAN.“The City of Hamilton believes that musicians and artists are entrepreneurs and being Licensed To Play with SOCAN helps ensure that music creators and publishers are fairly compensated for their hard work. Our Music Strategy and Hamilton Music Advisory Team are focused on cultivating local music creation and talent and encouraging others to support artists via SOCAN licensing and fair payment. A lot of time and effort is invested in the creative process before you listen to the final song,” said Debbie Spence, Business Development Consultant Creative Industries, City of Hamilton.While organizations that use music in their business are expected to abide by the law, constantly monitoring every one of Canada’s music-using businesses isn’t feasible. SOCAN works with businesses and their trade associations, as well as municipalities, to encourage them to stay up-to-date with their music licenses. Collectively, music licensing provides a major part of songwriters’, composers’, and music publishers’ livelihoods through royalties. It’s a vital aspect of Canada’smusic ecosystem.“The City of Hamilton is making a clear statement that it stands up for music rights and the need for songwriters, screen composers, and music publishers to be fairly compensated for their music,” said SOCAN Vice President of Licensing, Leslie Craig. “As the first Canadian city to receive this designation, it’s a milestone for the Hamilton music community, and the more than 150,000 songwriters, composers, and music publishers represented by SOCAN.”Licensed To Play is a long-term program encourages businesses to show that music is an instrumental aspect of the customer experience, and that they stand up for songwriters, screen composers, and music publishers who have created the valuable music that enhances their business.About SOCANSOCAN connects more than four-million music creators worldwide and more than a quarter-million businesses and individuals in Canada. More than 150,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers are its direct members, and more than 100,000 organizations are Licensed To Play music across Canada. With a concerted use of progressive technology and unique data as well as a commitment to lead the global transformation of music rights, with wholly-owned companies Audiam and MediaNet, SOCAN is dedicated to upholding the fundamental truths that music has value and music creators and publishers deserve fair compensation for their work. For more information: www.socan.comAbout the City of HamiltonHamilton is the fifth-largest city in Ontario and the tenth-largest city in Canada. As a global city, Hamilton boasts a renowned education and health sector, as well as a thriving arts scene. Industries in Hamilton include manufacturing, bioscience and medical, and agriculture. The City of Hamilton’s vision is to be the best place to raise a child and age successfully. The City’s mission is to provide high quality cost conscious public services that contribute to a healthy, safe and prosperous community, in a sustainable manner. www.hamilton.ca. Advertisement TORONTO, June 5, 2018 – The City of Hamilton is standing up for fair and legal music licensing for music creators, becoming the first Canadian municipality to receive a special SOCAN Licensed To Play designation.After confirming that all of its city-owned recreational facilities – including community halls, swimming pools, arenas, and other recreational services – are legally licensed by SOCAN to play commercially released music, Hamilton was given a Licensed To Play designation by SOCAN. It includes a Hamilton-specific version of the emblem that more than 40,000 Canadian music-using businesses have so far received to show their support of fair compensation for music creators.“We are proud to be the first Canadian municipality to receive the special Licensed To Play designation from SOCAN. Music is an important aspect of community, culture, and recreation activities, and can bring people from all backgrounds together through special events, festivals, fitness, and dance,” said Laura Kerr, Manager of Program Development, Recreation Division, at the City of Hamilton. Advertisement SOCAN has designated the City of Hamilton as the first Canadian municipality to be Licensed To Play, in support of legal and ethical music rights. (CNW Group/SOCAN) Facebookcenter_img Login/Register With: Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementlast_img read more

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THE 50 BEST FILMS OF 2018

15 Oct 2019

first_imgWith all that out of the way, here’s my list of the best films from 2018.Honourable Mentions: 22 July, American Animals, Ava, Black Cop, Blindspotting, Boy Erased, Charm City, Colette, The Crescent Crime + Punishment, Dark Money, Fail to Appear, The Hate U Give, Incredibles II, Let the Sunshine In, Lifechanger, Maison du Bonheur, Mary Goes Round, Mission: Impossible – Fallout, Never Look Away, Pick of the Litter, A Quiet Place, They Shall Not Grow Old, Stan & Ollie Instant FamilyI never thought I would be singing the praises of a film from the director of That’s My Boy and the Daddy’s Home films, but Sean Anders’ genuinely hilarious, heartfelt, and disarmingly emotional look at parents (Mark Wahlberg and Rose Byrne, both at their best) learning the ropes of adoption was one of the year’s most pleasant and unexpected surprises. Overlord/The Night Comes for UsThe best and most brutal action flicks of the year (albeit in different ways and to different degrees) are co-holders of the number fifty spot (one of three such instances in this countdown). Timo Tjahanto’s all out mobsters and martial arts extravaganza and Julus Avery’s clever meshing of a World War II epic with a gruesome monster movie were the most fun one could have this year watching people getting completely obliterated. Facebook Advertisement With 2018 all but over and done with, it’s time for me to look back on the year in cinema and come up with an obligatory, highly subjective, and reasoned to death ranking of the best films. Having seen over 400 films across the past year (of a total 744 that were released in Toronto, with even more if you count one-off screenings or Oscar contenders that won’t be opening in the city until the new year), it has always felt hard and unfair to only do a top ten. When you see that many films, the number that you genuinely love tends to go up drastically. By that same token, you also have to sit through a lot of middling, mediocre, and outright trashy garbage, but every year I’m able to come up with a list of fifty films that I think are the absolute best.This year was one of the hardest years for me to compile this list, not because there was an overall lack of choice, but because it was extremely difficult for me to cut the list down to fifty worthy candidates. In the past, I have never done honourable mentions for this list because there were usually only between two and five films that missed the cut. This year, with twenty-two films hovering just outside the proper ranking (and because I don’t want to up this list to the seventy-five best films of the year), I have decided to include some.I’m also frequently asked why my best of the year list comes out later than those of most critics. The answer to that is simple: I would rather be thorough and thoughtful with such a list than to be first. I’d rather take my time, rewatch certain films, and think long and hard about how I could even start ranking them. I’d always rather feel like I did the best ranking I could offer rather than put out the first ranking I could offer. While I will admit that the top fifteen films on this list (which is still actually a list of 53 films, for reasons you’ll see momentarily) more or less remained the same, the rest of the list was in constant, worthy flux. DestroyerA clever and twisty sort of Bad Lieutenant styled narrative with a sunken eyed Nicole Kidman relishing the opportunity to play a hard living antihero, the latest thriller from underrated director Karyn Kusama isn’t flashy or action packed, but it’s consistently riveting and intelligent. One of the few movies this year that builds to a big reveal that I honestly didn’t see coming. (Opens in Canada this January) Ben is BackA poignant look at the current opioid crisis as told through a mother (Julia Roberts) and addict son (Lucas Hedges) in emotional free fall, this latest (and overall best) film from writer-director Peter Hedges has a handful of on the nose moments that feel realistic and reasoned instead of manipulative and forced. It’s gutting and unflinching while also trying to explain matters of the heart and home that are complex and frequently misunderstood by those who’ve never watched someone’s addictions get the better of them. Of all the films to come out this year about addiction – and all the films to feature Lucas Hedges in a starring role – this is the one that’s a must see. WildlifeI thought long and hard about including Wildlife on this list. It’s assuredly a 2018 release, and yet, the strong debut directorial feature from Paul Dano never received Canadian distribution (although it did come out in America and several other major markets, and was put forward for this year’s Oscars). That’s a real shame because this story of a crumbling small town Montana family – comprised of Carey Mulligan, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Ed Oxenbould – was one of the best first features of the year. If it ever makes its way to theatres in Canada (which at this point seems highly unlikely) or VOD north of the border, definitely seek it out. Advertisementcenter_img Isle of DogsWhile Wes Anderson’s latest foray into stop motion wasn’t his best animated feature (that remains the eminently delightful Fantastic Mr. Fox by a very large margin), this story of a boy trying to save his dog in a vaguely futuristic/vaguely vintage Japan where mutts have been outlawed and exiled still has plenty to like within its exquisitely designed margins. Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The GuiltyDirected and co-written by Gustav Möller and centred around what basically amounts to a capably mounted one man show from leading man Jakob Cedergren, Sweden’s intense and entertaining selection for contention at this year’s Oscars is one of those foreign language thrillers that’s so good that I knew minutes into the film that someone in an English speaking country was going to remake it within the next few years. This past week proved me right (and it’s alleged to be starring Jake Gyllenhaal, which is a fine choice), so you’re definitely going to want to catch up with this story of a suspended cop turned emergency services phone operator before all your friends tell you have great and clever the reboot is. You’ll be in for a real treat. The Kindergarten TeacherBoasting one of the best leading performances of the year, courtesy of Maggie Gyllenhaal, Sara Colengelo’s remake of Nadav Lapid’s Israeli film about an educator and struggling writer who develops and unhealthy obsession with a student who displays a flair for poetry is as uncomfortable as movies get without being full blown psychotic. It’s not a thriller by any stretch, but it’s packed with suspense. McQueenWhat I know about fashion design and haute couture could fill a thimble, but I do know from sitting through hundreds of films ever year that Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui’s biography of late industry icon and game changer Steve McQueen was one of the finest and most insightful documentaries of the year. It’s a sterling example of a documentary where one doesn’t need to know much about its subject’s choice of profession to become immediately captivated and engrossed in their life. Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

first_imgWith all that out of the way, here’s my list of the best films from 2018.Honourable Mentions: 22 July, American Animals, Ava, Black Cop, Blindspotting, Boy Erased, Charm City, Colette, The Crescent Crime + Punishment, Dark Money, Fail to Appear, The Hate U Give, Incredibles II, Let the Sunshine In, Lifechanger, Maison du Bonheur, Mary Goes Round, Mission: Impossible – Fallout, Never Look Away, Pick of the Litter, A Quiet Place, They Shall Not Grow Old, Stan & Ollie Instant FamilyI never thought I would be singing the praises of a film from the director of That’s My Boy and the Daddy’s Home films, but Sean Anders’ genuinely hilarious, heartfelt, and disarmingly emotional look at parents (Mark Wahlberg and Rose Byrne, both at their best) learning the ropes of adoption was one of the year’s most pleasant and unexpected surprises. Overlord/The Night Comes for UsThe best and most brutal action flicks of the year (albeit in different ways and to different degrees) are co-holders of the number fifty spot (one of three such instances in this countdown). Timo Tjahanto’s all out mobsters and martial arts extravaganza and Julus Avery’s clever meshing of a World War II epic with a gruesome monster movie were the most fun one could have this year watching people getting completely obliterated. Facebook Advertisement With 2018 all but over and done with, it’s time for me to look back on the year in cinema and come up with an obligatory, highly subjective, and reasoned to death ranking of the best films. Having seen over 400 films across the past year (of a total 744 that were released in Toronto, with even more if you count one-off screenings or Oscar contenders that won’t be opening in the city until the new year), it has always felt hard and unfair to only do a top ten. When you see that many films, the number that you genuinely love tends to go up drastically. By that same token, you also have to sit through a lot of middling, mediocre, and outright trashy garbage, but every year I’m able to come up with a list of fifty films that I think are the absolute best.This year was one of the hardest years for me to compile this list, not because there was an overall lack of choice, but because it was extremely difficult for me to cut the list down to fifty worthy candidates. In the past, I have never done honourable mentions for this list because there were usually only between two and five films that missed the cut. This year, with twenty-two films hovering just outside the proper ranking (and because I don’t want to up this list to the seventy-five best films of the year), I have decided to include some.I’m also frequently asked why my best of the year list comes out later than those of most critics. The answer to that is simple: I would rather be thorough and thoughtful with such a list than to be first. I’d rather take my time, rewatch certain films, and think long and hard about how I could even start ranking them. I’d always rather feel like I did the best ranking I could offer rather than put out the first ranking I could offer. While I will admit that the top fifteen films on this list (which is still actually a list of 53 films, for reasons you’ll see momentarily) more or less remained the same, the rest of the list was in constant, worthy flux. DestroyerA clever and twisty sort of Bad Lieutenant styled narrative with a sunken eyed Nicole Kidman relishing the opportunity to play a hard living antihero, the latest thriller from underrated director Karyn Kusama isn’t flashy or action packed, but it’s consistently riveting and intelligent. One of the few movies this year that builds to a big reveal that I honestly didn’t see coming. (Opens in Canada this January) Ben is BackA poignant look at the current opioid crisis as told through a mother (Julia Roberts) and addict son (Lucas Hedges) in emotional free fall, this latest (and overall best) film from writer-director Peter Hedges has a handful of on the nose moments that feel realistic and reasoned instead of manipulative and forced. It’s gutting and unflinching while also trying to explain matters of the heart and home that are complex and frequently misunderstood by those who’ve never watched someone’s addictions get the better of them. Of all the films to come out this year about addiction – and all the films to feature Lucas Hedges in a starring role – this is the one that’s a must see. WildlifeI thought long and hard about including Wildlife on this list. It’s assuredly a 2018 release, and yet, the strong debut directorial feature from Paul Dano never received Canadian distribution (although it did come out in America and several other major markets, and was put forward for this year’s Oscars). That’s a real shame because this story of a crumbling small town Montana family – comprised of Carey Mulligan, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Ed Oxenbould – was one of the best first features of the year. If it ever makes its way to theatres in Canada (which at this point seems highly unlikely) or VOD north of the border, definitely seek it out. Advertisementcenter_img Isle of DogsWhile Wes Anderson’s latest foray into stop motion wasn’t his best animated feature (that remains the eminently delightful Fantastic Mr. Fox by a very large margin), this story of a boy trying to save his dog in a vaguely futuristic/vaguely vintage Japan where mutts have been outlawed and exiled still has plenty to like within its exquisitely designed margins. Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The GuiltyDirected and co-written by Gustav Möller and centred around what basically amounts to a capably mounted one man show from leading man Jakob Cedergren, Sweden’s intense and entertaining selection for contention at this year’s Oscars is one of those foreign language thrillers that’s so good that I knew minutes into the film that someone in an English speaking country was going to remake it within the next few years. This past week proved me right (and it’s alleged to be starring Jake Gyllenhaal, which is a fine choice), so you’re definitely going to want to catch up with this story of a suspended cop turned emergency services phone operator before all your friends tell you have great and clever the reboot is. You’ll be in for a real treat. The Kindergarten TeacherBoasting one of the best leading performances of the year, courtesy of Maggie Gyllenhaal, Sara Colengelo’s remake of Nadav Lapid’s Israeli film about an educator and struggling writer who develops and unhealthy obsession with a student who displays a flair for poetry is as uncomfortable as movies get without being full blown psychotic. It’s not a thriller by any stretch, but it’s packed with suspense. McQueenWhat I know about fashion design and haute couture could fill a thimble, but I do know from sitting through hundreds of films ever year that Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui’s biography of late industry icon and game changer Steve McQueen was one of the finest and most insightful documentaries of the year. It’s a sterling example of a documentary where one doesn’t need to know much about its subject’s choice of profession to become immediately captivated and engrossed in their life. Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Dancing through Greyeyes marvellous career

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsIn his three decades on the stage and screen, Michael Greyeyes has emerged as a respected director, choreographer, dancer and actor.APTN National News reporter Tina House recently caught up with him in Vancouver to review the many achievements of a remarkable First Nations man.last_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsIn his three decades on the stage and screen, Michael Greyeyes has emerged as a respected director, choreographer, dancer and actor.APTN National News reporter Tina House recently caught up with him in Vancouver to review the many achievements of a remarkable First Nations man.last_img

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Yukon activist claims brutally attacked by RCMP

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Yukon activist says she was sent to a Vancouver hospital for treatment after an incident involving an RCMP officer.The Whitehorse RCMP is now seeking an outside police agency to conduct an investigation into the allegation.APTN National News reporter Shirley McLean has this story.last_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Yukon activist says she was sent to a Vancouver hospital for treatment after an incident involving an RCMP officer.The Whitehorse RCMP is now seeking an outside police agency to conduct an investigation into the allegation.APTN National News reporter Shirley McLean has this story.last_img

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North facing increased hunger

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsMore people in the North are using food banks than ever before and local organizations in the three territories can’t always keep up with demand.As APTN National News reporter Cullen Crozier finds that the North is once again falling behind the rest of the country when it comes to food security.last_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsMore people in the North are using food banks than ever before and local organizations in the three territories can’t always keep up with demand.As APTN National News reporter Cullen Crozier finds that the North is once again falling behind the rest of the country when it comes to food security.last_img

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Sinclair social worker didnt keep record of visits

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsAt the Phoenix Sinclair inquiry in Winnipeg, social worker Delores Chief-Abogisis spent her second day in a row on the stand Tuesday.She was grilled about details of her contacts with Sinclair’s family because many of her visits were not documented.Abigosis explained that due to the high caseload workers faced, it was difficult to maintain records of all contact and visits. She had trouble remembering much of her visits.She said she wasn’t aware of any maltreatment of the five-year-old Sinclair whose body was found in 2005 after being returned to her parents.last_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsAt the Phoenix Sinclair inquiry in Winnipeg, social worker Delores Chief-Abogisis spent her second day in a row on the stand Tuesday.She was grilled about details of her contacts with Sinclair’s family because many of her visits were not documented.Abigosis explained that due to the high caseload workers faced, it was difficult to maintain records of all contact and visits. She had trouble remembering much of her visits.She said she wasn’t aware of any maltreatment of the five-year-old Sinclair whose body was found in 2005 after being returned to her parents.last_img

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InFocus The Right to Be Cold

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN InFocus with Cheryl McKenzie:In this edition, Inuk and Nobel Peace Prize nominee, Sheila Watt-Cloutier shares why climate change is eroding Inuit culture with her new book, The Right to Be Cold.We also bring you highlights from The Walrus Talks – Arctic.Watch Inuk artists, Tanya Tagaq and Ruben Anton Komangapik share their perspective on the Arctic and what motivates them to keep creating new and vibrant works of art through the land and sound.last_img

first_imgAPTN InFocus with Cheryl McKenzie:In this edition, Inuk and Nobel Peace Prize nominee, Sheila Watt-Cloutier shares why climate change is eroding Inuit culture with her new book, The Right to Be Cold.We also bring you highlights from The Walrus Talks – Arctic.Watch Inuk artists, Tanya Tagaq and Ruben Anton Komangapik share their perspective on the Arctic and what motivates them to keep creating new and vibrant works of art through the land and sound.last_img

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Mikmaq say Bay of Fundy developments could harm endangered fish

14 Oct 2019

first_imgEditors Note: DFO says the amended recovery strategy plan for the critical habitat of Inner Bay of Fundy salmon ‎won’t be ready for the minister to sign off on by the fall as reported. But a draft will be ready for public input.Trina Roache APTN National NewsIn Nova Scotia, people are concerned about the impacts of big projects on endangered fish in one of the world’s most famous waterways.Two projects are being considered by the province on the Bay of Fundy.Its high and low tides are also home to a number of fish that are on the endangered species list.last_img

first_imgEditors Note: DFO says the amended recovery strategy plan for the critical habitat of Inner Bay of Fundy salmon ‎won’t be ready for the minister to sign off on by the fall as reported. But a draft will be ready for public input.Trina Roache APTN National NewsIn Nova Scotia, people are concerned about the impacts of big projects on endangered fish in one of the world’s most famous waterways.Two projects are being considered by the province on the Bay of Fundy.Its high and low tides are also home to a number of fish that are on the endangered species list.last_img

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Toronto tattoo artist raising money and awareness for MMIW

14 Oct 2019

first_imgBeverly Andrews APTN National NewsWhen two young girls went missing and were later found dead in Kenora last year Jenn Liles felt it was important not to let their deaths go unnoticed or be forgotten.Liles is originally from the Kenora area and decided to use her skills as a tattoo artist to raise awareness in Toronto.On the 14th of every month she will be donating all proceeds from her work to charities that help Indigneous women and families of MMIW.“Tattoos are usually pretty important to people. It’s how people kind of mark their history on themselves and I think that usually helps a lot of people with healing and loss of family members and loved ones,” she said. “Some people just want a cool tattoo, so it kind of works out. You can gift to somebody but also receive something.”She also has specified tattoos to honour Indigenous women.bandrews@aptn.calast_img read more

first_imgBeverly Andrews APTN National NewsWhen two young girls went missing and were later found dead in Kenora last year Jenn Liles felt it was important not to let their deaths go unnoticed or be forgotten.Liles is originally from the Kenora area and decided to use her skills as a tattoo artist to raise awareness in Toronto.On the 14th of every month she will be donating all proceeds from her work to charities that help Indigneous women and families of MMIW.“Tattoos are usually pretty important to people. It’s how people kind of mark their history on themselves and I think that usually helps a lot of people with healing and loss of family members and loved ones,” she said. “Some people just want a cool tattoo, so it kind of works out. You can gift to somebody but also receive something.”She also has specified tattoos to honour Indigenous women.bandrews@aptn.calast_img read more

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Human rights complaint seeks Ontario school ban on clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes

14 Oct 2019

first_img(Lynne Courchene and Jean-Paul Allard are behind an Ontario human rights complaint. Photo courtesy of the family)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsOntario’s Ministry of Education is battling an Ottawa family before the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal who filed a complaint aimed at banning the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes in schools across the province.The complaint was filed this past December by Jean-Paul Allard on behalf of his eight year-old daughter Isabela Courchene. The case is headed for mediation on September 7. The complaint alleges the Ministry of Education is discriminating against Indigenous students by allowing the use of clothing that stereotypes their culture or displays racial slurs.Allard, an educational assistant with the Catholic School Board in Ottawa whose wife Lynne Courchene is from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba, said allowing the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes or slurs contravenes the province’s Safe Schools Act, which guarantees a safe learning environment for all students.“What is there to mediate? There is Bill 81, the Safe Schools Act, which clearly states that all members of the school community are supposed to be treated with respect and dignity,” said Allard. “I don’t see how allowing students to wear clothing that has the stereotypical images of First Nations or a slur on it like ‘Redmen’ or ‘Redskins’ is in line with that policy…. Either you are offering First Nations students equal protection under these laws or you’re not.”Ontario has asked the tribunal to dismiss the complaint arguing it is up to individual school boards to set policies around clothing.“The ministry is not liable for the operational decisions of individual school boards or schools. School boards, not the ministry, are responsible for ensuring their own compliance with the (Human Rights Code),” said Ontario’s submission before the tribunal. “Including imposing any limits on wearing clothing displaying Indigenous themed team mascots, logos or names in their schools that are required to comply with the Code.”Ontario’s submission also stated Education Minister Mitzie Hunter wrote the chairs of Ontario’s school boards on Jan. 18 requesting they review potentially offensive team logos and mascots with local Indigenous “partners.” That same day, the ministry’s deputy minister wrote the province’s directors of education to do the same, according to the submission filed in March.Courchene said it is up to the provincial ministry to set the standard and the issue is one of fundamental human rights.“We want to be treated equally as any other minority group. Our kids deserve that and they deserve to go to a school where there is no disrespect and they’ll feel welcomed going in,” said Courchene. “We want a ruling that…says we are going to ban all the clothing accessories and the names of teams that are offensive to people…. The only way that actual reconciliation can truly happen is through children and teaching them from a young age that it is not acceptable.”(Isabela Courchene, 8. Photo courtesy of the family.)Courchene said she decided to act on the issue in November 2015 when she was out shopping with three of her four children in an Ottawa suburb and crossed paths with a children’s hockey team from Sudbury, Ont. The players were all wearing their red team tracksuits with a TD Bank trademark, a logo resembling the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks along with their team name: Copper Cliff Redmen.“It was so normal, so ingrained in people that no one took a second glance at what was said on their shirts. It is so ingrained in society that there is nothing wrong with this,” said Courchene. “There is no problem with Aboriginal people being used a mascot or a stereotype and that sort of proves it right there.”Courchene said she has written support from several First Nations in Ontario, but is waiting for permission to release their names.The band council from the Iroquois community of Six Nations, which has the largest population of any reserve in Canada, passed a motion last September supporting the human rights complaint.Courchene said she is still working on building more support.“We want to raise enough awareness so (Ontario) can’t turn around at mediation and say it’s only us,” she said. “We are trying to overwhelmingly show them that this is not the case. If we are armed with other First Nations saying that they don’t agree with this and they don’t think that it is okay and they want this to be changed, then we are hoping when (Ontario gets) there they will see that and they won’t be able to wiggle out of it.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

first_img(Lynne Courchene and Jean-Paul Allard are behind an Ontario human rights complaint. Photo courtesy of the family)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsOntario’s Ministry of Education is battling an Ottawa family before the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal who filed a complaint aimed at banning the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes in schools across the province.The complaint was filed this past December by Jean-Paul Allard on behalf of his eight year-old daughter Isabela Courchene. The case is headed for mediation on September 7. The complaint alleges the Ministry of Education is discriminating against Indigenous students by allowing the use of clothing that stereotypes their culture or displays racial slurs.Allard, an educational assistant with the Catholic School Board in Ottawa whose wife Lynne Courchene is from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba, said allowing the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes or slurs contravenes the province’s Safe Schools Act, which guarantees a safe learning environment for all students.“What is there to mediate? There is Bill 81, the Safe Schools Act, which clearly states that all members of the school community are supposed to be treated with respect and dignity,” said Allard. “I don’t see how allowing students to wear clothing that has the stereotypical images of First Nations or a slur on it like ‘Redmen’ or ‘Redskins’ is in line with that policy…. Either you are offering First Nations students equal protection under these laws or you’re not.”Ontario has asked the tribunal to dismiss the complaint arguing it is up to individual school boards to set policies around clothing.“The ministry is not liable for the operational decisions of individual school boards or schools. School boards, not the ministry, are responsible for ensuring their own compliance with the (Human Rights Code),” said Ontario’s submission before the tribunal. “Including imposing any limits on wearing clothing displaying Indigenous themed team mascots, logos or names in their schools that are required to comply with the Code.”Ontario’s submission also stated Education Minister Mitzie Hunter wrote the chairs of Ontario’s school boards on Jan. 18 requesting they review potentially offensive team logos and mascots with local Indigenous “partners.” That same day, the ministry’s deputy minister wrote the province’s directors of education to do the same, according to the submission filed in March.Courchene said it is up to the provincial ministry to set the standard and the issue is one of fundamental human rights.“We want to be treated equally as any other minority group. Our kids deserve that and they deserve to go to a school where there is no disrespect and they’ll feel welcomed going in,” said Courchene. “We want a ruling that…says we are going to ban all the clothing accessories and the names of teams that are offensive to people…. The only way that actual reconciliation can truly happen is through children and teaching them from a young age that it is not acceptable.”(Isabela Courchene, 8. Photo courtesy of the family.)Courchene said she decided to act on the issue in November 2015 when she was out shopping with three of her four children in an Ottawa suburb and crossed paths with a children’s hockey team from Sudbury, Ont. The players were all wearing their red team tracksuits with a TD Bank trademark, a logo resembling the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks along with their team name: Copper Cliff Redmen.“It was so normal, so ingrained in people that no one took a second glance at what was said on their shirts. It is so ingrained in society that there is nothing wrong with this,” said Courchene. “There is no problem with Aboriginal people being used a mascot or a stereotype and that sort of proves it right there.”Courchene said she has written support from several First Nations in Ontario, but is waiting for permission to release their names.The band council from the Iroquois community of Six Nations, which has the largest population of any reserve in Canada, passed a motion last September supporting the human rights complaint.Courchene said she is still working on building more support.“We want to raise enough awareness so (Ontario) can’t turn around at mediation and say it’s only us,” she said. “We are trying to overwhelmingly show them that this is not the case. If we are armed with other First Nations saying that they don’t agree with this and they don’t think that it is okay and they want this to be changed, then we are hoping when (Ontario gets) there they will see that and they won’t be able to wiggle out of it.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Chief urges Manitoba Hydro to scrap challenge against electricity rate freeze for

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN NewsThe Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs (AMC) is calling on Manitoba Hydro to roll back its challenge against an order to freeze electricity rates for First Nations communities in the province.A month ago the Public Utilities Board (PUB) ruled Hydro must create an “On Reserve First Nations” customer class with no rate increase for the coming year to deal with what it calls energy poverty.Now the Crown corporation is challenging the order, a move Grand Chief Arlen Dumas calls “unfortunate.”“The Public Utilities Board’s decision to create a new First Nations on-reserve rate was an important step towards alleviating energy poverty,” he said. “At a time when Manitoba Hydro and governments are constantly talking about reconciliation, it’s unfortunate that they would try to overturn this important decision.“AMC is calling on Hydro to withdraw its application to stay the PUBs order, and is considering all of its legal options to protect the order.”Hydro argues the utilities board does not have the legal authority to make this kind of ruling.According to the Manitoba Hydro Act, the rates charged for power supplied to a class of grid customers “shall be the same throughout the province.”Scott Powell, director of corporate communications for Manitoba Hydro, said the PUB is possibly ordering the Crown corporation to do something illegal.“We understand the case for energy poverty. We understand it’s an issue. But that isn’t the issue for us in this particular case,” he said, adding it’s a jurisdictional and legal issue.“I don’t think any one of our customers would expect us to operate outside the law.”A panel will now be put in place to resolve the dispute.If Hydro is unsuccessful it can go to court.The board’s ruling from May 1 increased rates by 3.6 per cent on average, less than the 7.9 per cent requested by Hydro.At the time, Hydro said it’s projecting debt levels of up to $27 billion.-With files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgAPTN NewsThe Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs (AMC) is calling on Manitoba Hydro to roll back its challenge against an order to freeze electricity rates for First Nations communities in the province.A month ago the Public Utilities Board (PUB) ruled Hydro must create an “On Reserve First Nations” customer class with no rate increase for the coming year to deal with what it calls energy poverty.Now the Crown corporation is challenging the order, a move Grand Chief Arlen Dumas calls “unfortunate.”“The Public Utilities Board’s decision to create a new First Nations on-reserve rate was an important step towards alleviating energy poverty,” he said. “At a time when Manitoba Hydro and governments are constantly talking about reconciliation, it’s unfortunate that they would try to overturn this important decision.“AMC is calling on Hydro to withdraw its application to stay the PUBs order, and is considering all of its legal options to protect the order.”Hydro argues the utilities board does not have the legal authority to make this kind of ruling.According to the Manitoba Hydro Act, the rates charged for power supplied to a class of grid customers “shall be the same throughout the province.”Scott Powell, director of corporate communications for Manitoba Hydro, said the PUB is possibly ordering the Crown corporation to do something illegal.“We understand the case for energy poverty. We understand it’s an issue. But that isn’t the issue for us in this particular case,” he said, adding it’s a jurisdictional and legal issue.“I don’t think any one of our customers would expect us to operate outside the law.”A panel will now be put in place to resolve the dispute.If Hydro is unsuccessful it can go to court.The board’s ruling from May 1 increased rates by 3.6 per cent on average, less than the 7.9 per cent requested by Hydro.At the time, Hydro said it’s projecting debt levels of up to $27 billion.-With files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Family living on shore of Frobisher Bay loses everything in fire

14 Oct 2019

first_imgJason, Elizabeth and their son are living in a tent in Iqaluit. (Submitted photo)Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsA homeless family in Iqaluit lost everything they owned last weekend when the beach shack they were squatting in burned to the ground.It was a huge blow for the struggling trio that moved to the Arctic capital from Pangnirtung about 10 months ago to escape what they said is escalating violence in the hamlet.“We didn’t want him seeing that all the time,” father Jason Kakee said of his 13-year-old son.“There was too much violent crime up there.”The family, which includes mother Elizabeth, confirms what Pangnirtung officials announced in May that the community was awash in assaults, arson and suicide attempts.Hamlet officials wrote to the territorial government for help and revealed shocking statistics: 12 young people tried to kill themselves, 55 people called the poison control centre, and a teenager fired a gun 11 times in the middle of a September night.“Violent events in Pang have now become a daily occurrence,” said the letter from the municipal council. “Bootlegging is rampant and uncontrolled.“If adequate urgency response services are not provided immediately, more and more people in Pangnirtung will be physically injured, emotionally traumatized and more lives will be lost.”Things were bad enough for Kakee to pull up stakes and spend last winter in a wooden shack on the shore of Frobisher Bay without heat, water and plumbing.“It was really, really cold,” he said in a video filmed this week by Qaumariaq Inuqtaqau and posted to the activist’s Facebook page Shame on Canada.“We’ve been going to the food bank but sometimes we go hungry… We don’t have cooking supplies.”Their escape to the capital landed them in the middle of another Nunavut crisis – a chronic lack of housing in the territory.Kakee said they were walking back from the store in time to see flames shooting into the sky. What caused the fire is unknown.“I was crying. We lost everything we had,” he said. “Our clothes… our bedding materials. Everything’s gone.”About 100 homeless people live in rickety shacks, ripped tents and old boats along Iqaluit’s rocky shores, noted Inuqtaqau, because there aren’t enough homes, transitional spaces or room for couples and families in the city’s two shelters.“I’ve been asking for help for these people for the last two-and-half years,” he said Friday.Inuqtaqau said local businesses donated some clothing, groceries, a nylon tent and camping stove but he worries about the family with another winter looming.“I’m desperate,” Kakee says on the video. “We need a place to live with my son.“He has asthma; his lungs gets weak very fast sometimes.”The use of camp stoves and fuel, among other problems, has sparked several fires in the makeshift homeless community, including one that killed a man.This abandoned boat was someone’s home. (submitted photo)“They could have actually saved some lives if they gave people a house,” said Inuqtaqau, who claims politicians and Inuit leaders are ignoring the emergency.He says vulnerable people are at risk while government homes stand empty waiting to be awarded to out-of-town workers as part of their employment contracts.“Southerners get housing and food subsidies while Inuks sleep on the beach,” Inuqtaqau said.Kakee said the situation makes him sad.“I was feeling really down because I didn’t want him to live like this,” he said of his son.“We need a house. I want him to feel free and have friends around him.”If the family makes a home in Iqaluit remains to be seen, but Mayor Madeleine Redfern says a multi-million-dollar expansion planned for the men’s shelter should ease some of the perilous conditions.“It’s an issue that, as mayor, I have brought to the attention of both the governments of Nunavut and the federal government,” she said in a telephone interview Friday, noting she had visited the homeless family on the beach.She said she was starting to hear about some flexibility in who gets housing owned by the territorial and federal governments, including employees relocating within Nunavut and not just those coming from outside the territory.Redfern noted the city itself doesn’t build houses but makes land available.To that end, she said work is underway to prepare a new subdivision for development next summer.–with files by The Canadian Press kmartens@aptn.ca@katmartelast_img read more

first_imgJason, Elizabeth and their son are living in a tent in Iqaluit. (Submitted photo)Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsA homeless family in Iqaluit lost everything they owned last weekend when the beach shack they were squatting in burned to the ground.It was a huge blow for the struggling trio that moved to the Arctic capital from Pangnirtung about 10 months ago to escape what they said is escalating violence in the hamlet.“We didn’t want him seeing that all the time,” father Jason Kakee said of his 13-year-old son.“There was too much violent crime up there.”The family, which includes mother Elizabeth, confirms what Pangnirtung officials announced in May that the community was awash in assaults, arson and suicide attempts.Hamlet officials wrote to the territorial government for help and revealed shocking statistics: 12 young people tried to kill themselves, 55 people called the poison control centre, and a teenager fired a gun 11 times in the middle of a September night.“Violent events in Pang have now become a daily occurrence,” said the letter from the municipal council. “Bootlegging is rampant and uncontrolled.“If adequate urgency response services are not provided immediately, more and more people in Pangnirtung will be physically injured, emotionally traumatized and more lives will be lost.”Things were bad enough for Kakee to pull up stakes and spend last winter in a wooden shack on the shore of Frobisher Bay without heat, water and plumbing.“It was really, really cold,” he said in a video filmed this week by Qaumariaq Inuqtaqau and posted to the activist’s Facebook page Shame on Canada.“We’ve been going to the food bank but sometimes we go hungry… We don’t have cooking supplies.”Their escape to the capital landed them in the middle of another Nunavut crisis – a chronic lack of housing in the territory.Kakee said they were walking back from the store in time to see flames shooting into the sky. What caused the fire is unknown.“I was crying. We lost everything we had,” he said. “Our clothes… our bedding materials. Everything’s gone.”About 100 homeless people live in rickety shacks, ripped tents and old boats along Iqaluit’s rocky shores, noted Inuqtaqau, because there aren’t enough homes, transitional spaces or room for couples and families in the city’s two shelters.“I’ve been asking for help for these people for the last two-and-half years,” he said Friday.Inuqtaqau said local businesses donated some clothing, groceries, a nylon tent and camping stove but he worries about the family with another winter looming.“I’m desperate,” Kakee says on the video. “We need a place to live with my son.“He has asthma; his lungs gets weak very fast sometimes.”The use of camp stoves and fuel, among other problems, has sparked several fires in the makeshift homeless community, including one that killed a man.This abandoned boat was someone’s home. (submitted photo)“They could have actually saved some lives if they gave people a house,” said Inuqtaqau, who claims politicians and Inuit leaders are ignoring the emergency.He says vulnerable people are at risk while government homes stand empty waiting to be awarded to out-of-town workers as part of their employment contracts.“Southerners get housing and food subsidies while Inuks sleep on the beach,” Inuqtaqau said.Kakee said the situation makes him sad.“I was feeling really down because I didn’t want him to live like this,” he said of his son.“We need a house. I want him to feel free and have friends around him.”If the family makes a home in Iqaluit remains to be seen, but Mayor Madeleine Redfern says a multi-million-dollar expansion planned for the men’s shelter should ease some of the perilous conditions.“It’s an issue that, as mayor, I have brought to the attention of both the governments of Nunavut and the federal government,” she said in a telephone interview Friday, noting she had visited the homeless family on the beach.She said she was starting to hear about some flexibility in who gets housing owned by the territorial and federal governments, including employees relocating within Nunavut and not just those coming from outside the territory.Redfern noted the city itself doesn’t build houses but makes land available.To that end, she said work is underway to prepare a new subdivision for development next summer.–with files by The Canadian Press kmartens@aptn.ca@katmartelast_img read more

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Wetsuweten chef turned activist in Quebec ready to take on the politicians

14 Oct 2019

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsOn a cold, snowy Wednesday in Montreal, Marlene Hale finds herself huddled outside with two dozen activists who are hoping to get a word in with Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna who was in the city to make an announcement.“What is she doing to protect the environment as a minister?” said Hale when asked what she was going to put to McKenna.“I would like for her to really, really take a second look at many things, not just oil and gas but the coal that is going into Telkwa region B.C. north.”Hale wasn’t always politically active.She’s a chef by trade.But that all changed earlier this month when the RCMP raided an anti-pipeline camp on the Wet’suwet’en woman’s territory.“I was just innocently making bannock, and serving it,” said Hale of January 7 – the day 14 people were arrested at the Gidimt’en camp in British Columbia.  “and all of a sudden the world just changes on a dime.”Having spent the last seven years living in Montreal, Hale felt compelled to contribute to the anti-pipeline struggle back home even though she lives thousands of kilometres away.So she’s taken it upon herself to chase after the upper echelons of the federal government.Hale has already had success speaking to high level government officials.Hale was able to ask questions on behalf of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs to Justin Trudeau at a recent town hall in Saint-Hyacinthe QC last Friday.“I was nervous,” said Hale. “I was the second to last question, I didn’t know if I was going to get picked to ask it.”When her opportunity arrived, Hale pressed Trudeau on what she called a flawed consultation process with her people.“The Wet’suwet’en have demonstrated in the Supreme Court over and over again that the hereditary chiefs are the decision makers on our land,” Hale asked Trudeau “Yet you tout the agreements with the federal band councils as a victory for this enormous project.”Trudeau’s response agreed that the consultation process needs to be improved.“We need to support you in the creation of a process that  will bring those voices together in a unified process so that we can seek  consent for energy projects,” replied Trudeau “What we’ve seen this past week is the fact that the processes we have right now are not yet the right processes.”Hale says she appreciates the way Trudeau took the time to respectfully answer her questions, although she thinks that he fails to understand that in the opinion of many Wet’suwet’en, it’s only the consent of the hereditary chiefs that matter.As for McKenna, Hale didn’t get a chance to speak with the minister personally, but one of the activists she is working with will attempt to read a statement on her behalf.“Suddenly everybody knows that I’m the only Wet’suwet’en in Quebec, but that’s okay, I’m just here to spread the message, to spread the word, spread my culture and my people and the fight we have ahead of us.”Hale isn’t sure what the next move will be, but she’s not intending to stop until the pipeline issue on her territory is over. Even if it means putting bannock baking on hold.tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsOn a cold, snowy Wednesday in Montreal, Marlene Hale finds herself huddled outside with two dozen activists who are hoping to get a word in with Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna who was in the city to make an announcement.“What is she doing to protect the environment as a minister?” said Hale when asked what she was going to put to McKenna.“I would like for her to really, really take a second look at many things, not just oil and gas but the coal that is going into Telkwa region B.C. north.”Hale wasn’t always politically active.She’s a chef by trade.But that all changed earlier this month when the RCMP raided an anti-pipeline camp on the Wet’suwet’en woman’s territory.“I was just innocently making bannock, and serving it,” said Hale of January 7 – the day 14 people were arrested at the Gidimt’en camp in British Columbia.  “and all of a sudden the world just changes on a dime.”Having spent the last seven years living in Montreal, Hale felt compelled to contribute to the anti-pipeline struggle back home even though she lives thousands of kilometres away.So she’s taken it upon herself to chase after the upper echelons of the federal government.Hale has already had success speaking to high level government officials.Hale was able to ask questions on behalf of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs to Justin Trudeau at a recent town hall in Saint-Hyacinthe QC last Friday.“I was nervous,” said Hale. “I was the second to last question, I didn’t know if I was going to get picked to ask it.”When her opportunity arrived, Hale pressed Trudeau on what she called a flawed consultation process with her people.“The Wet’suwet’en have demonstrated in the Supreme Court over and over again that the hereditary chiefs are the decision makers on our land,” Hale asked Trudeau “Yet you tout the agreements with the federal band councils as a victory for this enormous project.”Trudeau’s response agreed that the consultation process needs to be improved.“We need to support you in the creation of a process that  will bring those voices together in a unified process so that we can seek  consent for energy projects,” replied Trudeau “What we’ve seen this past week is the fact that the processes we have right now are not yet the right processes.”Hale says she appreciates the way Trudeau took the time to respectfully answer her questions, although she thinks that he fails to understand that in the opinion of many Wet’suwet’en, it’s only the consent of the hereditary chiefs that matter.As for McKenna, Hale didn’t get a chance to speak with the minister personally, but one of the activists she is working with will attempt to read a statement on her behalf.“Suddenly everybody knows that I’m the only Wet’suwet’en in Quebec, but that’s okay, I’m just here to spread the message, to spread the word, spread my culture and my people and the fight we have ahead of us.”Hale isn’t sure what the next move will be, but she’s not intending to stop until the pipeline issue on her territory is over. Even if it means putting bannock baking on hold.tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more

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Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the

13 Oct 2019

first_imgTORONTO – Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week:Air Canada earningsAir Canada discusses first-quarter results on Monday. The Montreal-based carrier recently took advantage of labour uncertainty at rival WestJet with a suggestion that it is ready to pick up the slack in the event that WestJet’s pilots walk off the job.Economic snapshotStatistics Canada releases the latest gross domestic product report from February on Tuesday. The previous report for January showed that the Canadian economy contracted 0.1 per cent, hurt by unscheduled maintenance shutdowns in the oilpatch and weakness in the real estate sector following mortgage rule changes.BCE updateTelecom and media giant BCE Inc. discusses first-quarter results on Thursday. Both BCE and rival Rogers Communications recently increased their monthly internet prices, a move they say is justified by the investments they’re making in their networks.Canada’s Toys “R” Us saviourInsurance and investment company Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. releases first-quarter results on Thursday. President Paul Rivett said last week that its plans for Toys “R” Us are not limited to Canada, as it is exploring options to keep a foothold in the U.S. and elsewhere.Canada’s other energy exportWood pellet manufacturer Pinnacle Renewable Holdings Inc. discusses first-quarter results on Thursday. The company is one of Canada’s biggest players in an industry that is projected to see massive growth due to global demand for a carbon-neutral energy source to replace coal.last_img read more

first_imgTORONTO – Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week:Air Canada earningsAir Canada discusses first-quarter results on Monday. The Montreal-based carrier recently took advantage of labour uncertainty at rival WestJet with a suggestion that it is ready to pick up the slack in the event that WestJet’s pilots walk off the job.Economic snapshotStatistics Canada releases the latest gross domestic product report from February on Tuesday. The previous report for January showed that the Canadian economy contracted 0.1 per cent, hurt by unscheduled maintenance shutdowns in the oilpatch and weakness in the real estate sector following mortgage rule changes.BCE updateTelecom and media giant BCE Inc. discusses first-quarter results on Thursday. Both BCE and rival Rogers Communications recently increased their monthly internet prices, a move they say is justified by the investments they’re making in their networks.Canada’s Toys “R” Us saviourInsurance and investment company Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. releases first-quarter results on Thursday. President Paul Rivett said last week that its plans for Toys “R” Us are not limited to Canada, as it is exploring options to keep a foothold in the U.S. and elsewhere.Canada’s other energy exportWood pellet manufacturer Pinnacle Renewable Holdings Inc. discusses first-quarter results on Thursday. The company is one of Canada’s biggest players in an industry that is projected to see massive growth due to global demand for a carbon-neutral energy source to replace coal.last_img read more

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Federal government and First Nations to approve BC fish farms province

13 Oct 2019

first_imgVICTORIA – Fish farmers in British Columbia have four years to show their open-net operations don’t harm wild salmon and to get approval from First Nations to locate them in their territories as part of new rules introduced Wednesday.Agriculture Minister Lana Popham said the government is setting new standards for the renewal of fish farm operating tenures to protect wild salmon stocks and support reconciliation efforts with Indigenous Peoples.“Fish farms are unique, with impacts that are very difficult to contain,” Popham told a news conference. “We acknowledge that many factors are affecting wild salmon, and one of them is fish farms. Wild Salmon are critical to the culture and well-being of many B.C. First Nations.”Popham announced the new policies as tenures expired for 20 fish farms operating around the Broughton Archipelago off Vancouver Island.Opponents to open-net pen fish farms in the Broughton Archipelago have conducted protests and occupations on some of the farms, which they say pose a threat to wild salmon stocks by spreading viruses, diseases and sea lice.Popham said talks between Broughton-area First Nations and the government about the future of the tenures are ongoing though she wouldn’t comment on their status. She said the tenures for those fish farms will now continue on a month-to-month basis until some form of agreement is reached.British Columbia’s 120 fish farm sites are located on Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast and the Central Coast.A court ruling in 2009 clarified that the federal government had jurisdiction over regulating the farms, and B.C. will look to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to determine under what conditions the farms can operate without threatening wild salmon, Popham said.She said the four-year limit aligns with the 2022 renewal of licences for most of the fish farms currently operating in B.C.“B.C. is very aware that thousands of jobs depend on maintaining healthy marine environments, along with the livelihoods and economic prosperity of coastal communities and First Nations,” Popham said. “The challenges that face our wild salmon have been ignored for too long.”Chief Bob Chamberlin of the Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation, who is part of the group of Indigenous nations negotiating the Broughton Archipelago tenures, said he’s pleased the government has expressed its commitment to protect and rehabilitate wild salmon populations.He said he’s also enthused salmon farm operators must demonstrate they have reached agreements with First Nations to locate in their territory.But the 2022 deadline is too far away, Chamberlin said, adding the First Nations in the Broughton Archipelago area have been negotiating with the B.C. government since January on how to address the expired fish farm tenures.“We just have to dot one more I and debate a comma and then we’ll be ready to sign this process document,” said Chamberlin. “But the opinion I express on behalf of our First Nation and the group at the table is 2022 is too long.”B.C. Salmon Farmers Association spokesman Shawn Hall said the government has introduced significant changes to rules overseeing the approval process for fish farms and the industry will rely on the relationships it has built with First Nations.Salmon farms generate $1.5 billion annually in the B.C. economy and employ 6,600 people, he said.Green party MLA Adam Olsen said in a statement the new policy puts wild salmon at risk and does not address First Nations concerns.The BC Liberals said the government’s new tenure policy sends the wrong message about economic stability in the province.Resource opportunities critic Ellis Ross said in a statement the government has ignored the thousands of Indigenous people employed in the fish-farm industry.Last week, the government announced a 14-member advisory council, established to help restore and preserve B.C.’s wild salmon populations.last_img read more

first_imgVICTORIA – Fish farmers in British Columbia have four years to show their open-net operations don’t harm wild salmon and to get approval from First Nations to locate them in their territories as part of new rules introduced Wednesday.Agriculture Minister Lana Popham said the government is setting new standards for the renewal of fish farm operating tenures to protect wild salmon stocks and support reconciliation efforts with Indigenous Peoples.“Fish farms are unique, with impacts that are very difficult to contain,” Popham told a news conference. “We acknowledge that many factors are affecting wild salmon, and one of them is fish farms. Wild Salmon are critical to the culture and well-being of many B.C. First Nations.”Popham announced the new policies as tenures expired for 20 fish farms operating around the Broughton Archipelago off Vancouver Island.Opponents to open-net pen fish farms in the Broughton Archipelago have conducted protests and occupations on some of the farms, which they say pose a threat to wild salmon stocks by spreading viruses, diseases and sea lice.Popham said talks between Broughton-area First Nations and the government about the future of the tenures are ongoing though she wouldn’t comment on their status. She said the tenures for those fish farms will now continue on a month-to-month basis until some form of agreement is reached.British Columbia’s 120 fish farm sites are located on Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast and the Central Coast.A court ruling in 2009 clarified that the federal government had jurisdiction over regulating the farms, and B.C. will look to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to determine under what conditions the farms can operate without threatening wild salmon, Popham said.She said the four-year limit aligns with the 2022 renewal of licences for most of the fish farms currently operating in B.C.“B.C. is very aware that thousands of jobs depend on maintaining healthy marine environments, along with the livelihoods and economic prosperity of coastal communities and First Nations,” Popham said. “The challenges that face our wild salmon have been ignored for too long.”Chief Bob Chamberlin of the Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation, who is part of the group of Indigenous nations negotiating the Broughton Archipelago tenures, said he’s pleased the government has expressed its commitment to protect and rehabilitate wild salmon populations.He said he’s also enthused salmon farm operators must demonstrate they have reached agreements with First Nations to locate in their territory.But the 2022 deadline is too far away, Chamberlin said, adding the First Nations in the Broughton Archipelago area have been negotiating with the B.C. government since January on how to address the expired fish farm tenures.“We just have to dot one more I and debate a comma and then we’ll be ready to sign this process document,” said Chamberlin. “But the opinion I express on behalf of our First Nation and the group at the table is 2022 is too long.”B.C. Salmon Farmers Association spokesman Shawn Hall said the government has introduced significant changes to rules overseeing the approval process for fish farms and the industry will rely on the relationships it has built with First Nations.Salmon farms generate $1.5 billion annually in the B.C. economy and employ 6,600 people, he said.Green party MLA Adam Olsen said in a statement the new policy puts wild salmon at risk and does not address First Nations concerns.The BC Liberals said the government’s new tenure policy sends the wrong message about economic stability in the province.Resource opportunities critic Ellis Ross said in a statement the government has ignored the thousands of Indigenous people employed in the fish-farm industry.Last week, the government announced a 14-member advisory council, established to help restore and preserve B.C.’s wild salmon populations.last_img read more

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Talks to manage offshore Arctic drilling may signal end of ban NWT

13 Oct 2019

first_imgYELLOWKNIFE – The federal government is opening talks with northerners on managing offshore energy exploration in the Canadian Arctic, a move some hope signals a coming relaxation of the current ban on potential development.“I would hope that’s the case,” said Northwest Territories Premier Bob McLeod.“We’ll see as we negotiate. I certainly am feeling very optimistic.”Northern Affairs Minister Dominic Leblanc and Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi announced Thursday that Ottawa will negotiate a Beaufort Sea oil and gas co-management and revenue-sharing agreement with the governments of the Northwest Territories and Yukon, as well as the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation.In 2016, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced an indefinite moratorium on all offshore energy exploration in Canada’s Arctic, subject to a review every five years. He made the announcement in conjunction with then-U.S. president Barack Obama, who brought in similar measures.Since then, President Donald Trump has announced plans to open the American Arctic to drilling.Leblanc, who recently toured the northern capitals, emphasized the importance of resources to the territorial economies.“Our partners were very clear,” he said in a release.“They want to be involved in the management of Arctic offshore oil and gas resources, and they want to see economic prosperity and jobs that will benefit Indigenous peoples and all Northerners in the future without affecting the health of their environment.”Sohi said in a release that the government has been working with both the territories and the energy industry.“We heard loud and clear that the protection of the Arctic environment and the sustainable, inclusive development of the region for the benefit of Northern residents and all Canadians are critical to growing Canada’s economy.”McLeod said much will depend on the five-year review, due in 2021.“Unless we deal with the five-year review things don’t change that much. We’re hoping that after five years, they’ll get rid of (the moratorium).”He said his government will work toward an agreement similar to one reached by the Maritime provinces for their offshore.“The GNWT has been waiting for today’s announcement for some time and I appreciate that Minister LeBlanc has been able to make tangible progress,” he said in a release.Leblanc and Sohi also promised to involve northerners in a research program that takes into account marine and climate change science.After a flurry of interest in the early 2010s, interest in the Beaufort offshore died down. Imperial Oil, which still holds large exploration leases in those waters, cancelled its drilling program in 2015.As part of Thursday’s announcement, the government also said it would preserve existing offshore exploration rights for energy companies and refund remaining deposits related to those licences.There are 63 exploration and discovery licences in the Beaufort Sea. The financial consequences of that promise weren’t immediately clear.— By Bob Weber in Edmonton. Follow him on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more

first_imgYELLOWKNIFE – The federal government is opening talks with northerners on managing offshore energy exploration in the Canadian Arctic, a move some hope signals a coming relaxation of the current ban on potential development.“I would hope that’s the case,” said Northwest Territories Premier Bob McLeod.“We’ll see as we negotiate. I certainly am feeling very optimistic.”Northern Affairs Minister Dominic Leblanc and Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi announced Thursday that Ottawa will negotiate a Beaufort Sea oil and gas co-management and revenue-sharing agreement with the governments of the Northwest Territories and Yukon, as well as the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation.In 2016, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced an indefinite moratorium on all offshore energy exploration in Canada’s Arctic, subject to a review every five years. He made the announcement in conjunction with then-U.S. president Barack Obama, who brought in similar measures.Since then, President Donald Trump has announced plans to open the American Arctic to drilling.Leblanc, who recently toured the northern capitals, emphasized the importance of resources to the territorial economies.“Our partners were very clear,” he said in a release.“They want to be involved in the management of Arctic offshore oil and gas resources, and they want to see economic prosperity and jobs that will benefit Indigenous peoples and all Northerners in the future without affecting the health of their environment.”Sohi said in a release that the government has been working with both the territories and the energy industry.“We heard loud and clear that the protection of the Arctic environment and the sustainable, inclusive development of the region for the benefit of Northern residents and all Canadians are critical to growing Canada’s economy.”McLeod said much will depend on the five-year review, due in 2021.“Unless we deal with the five-year review things don’t change that much. We’re hoping that after five years, they’ll get rid of (the moratorium).”He said his government will work toward an agreement similar to one reached by the Maritime provinces for their offshore.“The GNWT has been waiting for today’s announcement for some time and I appreciate that Minister LeBlanc has been able to make tangible progress,” he said in a release.Leblanc and Sohi also promised to involve northerners in a research program that takes into account marine and climate change science.After a flurry of interest in the early 2010s, interest in the Beaufort offshore died down. Imperial Oil, which still holds large exploration leases in those waters, cancelled its drilling program in 2015.As part of Thursday’s announcement, the government also said it would preserve existing offshore exploration rights for energy companies and refund remaining deposits related to those licences.There are 63 exploration and discovery licences in the Beaufort Sea. The financial consequences of that promise weren’t immediately clear.— By Bob Weber in Edmonton. Follow him on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more

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CDC raises enough money for a new van

13 Oct 2019

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The Fort St. John Child Development Centre has officially met its fundraising goals for this year, allowing the Centre to purchase a new wheelchair-accessible van.The CDC’s executive director Tana Millner said that the organization raised the required $77,000 for the new 10-passenger van, which comes fully equipped with a mechanical lift for wheelchair-bound passengers. Millner said that the Centre’s old van was not wheelchair-accessible, causing headaches for the Centre’s staff. “Not having a wheelchair-accessible van with the population that we serve was very difficult sometimes,” said Millner. “It was a good thing that we were able to do it with the help of the community.”Millner said that the van has already been ordered, and the Centre expects to take delivery of the new van in 10 to 12 weeks.last_img read more

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The Fort St. John Child Development Centre has officially met its fundraising goals for this year, allowing the Centre to purchase a new wheelchair-accessible van.The CDC’s executive director Tana Millner said that the organization raised the required $77,000 for the new 10-passenger van, which comes fully equipped with a mechanical lift for wheelchair-bound passengers. Millner said that the Centre’s old van was not wheelchair-accessible, causing headaches for the Centre’s staff. “Not having a wheelchair-accessible van with the population that we serve was very difficult sometimes,” said Millner. “It was a good thing that we were able to do it with the help of the community.”Millner said that the van has already been ordered, and the Centre expects to take delivery of the new van in 10 to 12 weeks.last_img read more

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Seven held in AIIMS attack

12 Oct 2019

first_imgDelhi Police nabbed seven persons who were found involved in attacking a family outside AIIMS Trauma Centre on Sunday. The law enforcement agency has also identified a few more people involved in the case. Deputy Commissioner of Police (southwest) Devender Arya said that as soon case came to light they took action and after the proper investigation in the case arrests were made in this regard. Police said that apart from arrests, three-four people have been identified allegedly involved in the incident. “The case is being probed,” said the officer. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder The investigating agency said that on Sunday at about 3 PM a PCR call was received regarding quarrel at Trauma Center. The complainant reported that guards at the gate had injured her husband and assaulted her sister also. In all four members were examined and MLC prepared. On Sunday itself in this regard, a case under appropriate sections was registered at Safdarjung Enclave and five persons were nabbed . The police official said that they took proper action in the case.last_img read more

first_imgDelhi Police nabbed seven persons who were found involved in attacking a family outside AIIMS Trauma Centre on Sunday. The law enforcement agency has also identified a few more people involved in the case. Deputy Commissioner of Police (southwest) Devender Arya said that as soon case came to light they took action and after the proper investigation in the case arrests were made in this regard. Police said that apart from arrests, three-four people have been identified allegedly involved in the incident. “The case is being probed,” said the officer. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder The investigating agency said that on Sunday at about 3 PM a PCR call was received regarding quarrel at Trauma Center. The complainant reported that guards at the gate had injured her husband and assaulted her sister also. In all four members were examined and MLC prepared. On Sunday itself in this regard, a case under appropriate sections was registered at Safdarjung Enclave and five persons were nabbed . The police official said that they took proper action in the case.last_img read more

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Power supply cut keeps train on halt for two hours in Pandooah

12 Oct 2019

first_imgKolkata: Train services were disrupted for almost two hours after pantograph of a local train broke at the Pandooah station in Eastern Railway.The train immediately came to halt due to break in the power supply. According to sources, on Wednesday, at 1:39 pm, a local train destined to Howrah left the Pandooah station around 1:39 pm. Just after the train left the platform, one of the pantographs broke. As a result the train immediately came to halt due to break in power supply. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaImmediately station master at the Pandooah station was informed. Later, the station master informed the engineering department for repair work to be commenced soon. Within half-an-hour a tower van from Bandel arrived at the spot and started repair work. But, as the work was time consuming, passengers of the train had to wait for long time to reach their destinations. As the down line was totally closed several more trains have been stopped at multiple stations, waiting for the repair work to be done. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayAround 3 pm the repair work was completed and nor mal traiun services resumed from 3:04 pm. According to the Eastern Railway’s spokesperson, train services on the Barddhaman Howrah main line section were affected as the front pantograph of Down Barddhaman Howrah local was broken at Pandooah station blocking both down main line and reversible line. As a result, five local trains including four Down locals ran a lot behind schedule.last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Train services were disrupted for almost two hours after pantograph of a local train broke at the Pandooah station in Eastern Railway.The train immediately came to halt due to break in the power supply. According to sources, on Wednesday, at 1:39 pm, a local train destined to Howrah left the Pandooah station around 1:39 pm. Just after the train left the platform, one of the pantographs broke. As a result the train immediately came to halt due to break in power supply. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaImmediately station master at the Pandooah station was informed. Later, the station master informed the engineering department for repair work to be commenced soon. Within half-an-hour a tower van from Bandel arrived at the spot and started repair work. But, as the work was time consuming, passengers of the train had to wait for long time to reach their destinations. As the down line was totally closed several more trains have been stopped at multiple stations, waiting for the repair work to be done. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayAround 3 pm the repair work was completed and nor mal traiun services resumed from 3:04 pm. According to the Eastern Railway’s spokesperson, train services on the Barddhaman Howrah main line section were affected as the front pantograph of Down Barddhaman Howrah local was broken at Pandooah station blocking both down main line and reversible line. As a result, five local trains including four Down locals ran a lot behind schedule.last_img read more

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