Yukon activist claims brutally attacked by RCMP

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Yukon activist says she was sent to a Vancouver hospital for treatment after an incident involving an RCMP officer.The Whitehorse RCMP is now seeking an outside police agency to conduct an investigation into the allegation.APTN National News reporter Shirley McLean has this story.last_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Yukon activist says she was sent to a Vancouver hospital for treatment after an incident involving an RCMP officer.The Whitehorse RCMP is now seeking an outside police agency to conduct an investigation into the allegation.APTN National News reporter Shirley McLean has this story.last_img

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North facing increased hunger

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsMore people in the North are using food banks than ever before and local organizations in the three territories can’t always keep up with demand.As APTN National News reporter Cullen Crozier finds that the North is once again falling behind the rest of the country when it comes to food security.last_img

first_imgAPTN National NewsMore people in the North are using food banks than ever before and local organizations in the three territories can’t always keep up with demand.As APTN National News reporter Cullen Crozier finds that the North is once again falling behind the rest of the country when it comes to food security.last_img

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Human rights complaint seeks Ontario school ban on clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes

14 Oct 2019

first_img(Lynne Courchene and Jean-Paul Allard are behind an Ontario human rights complaint. Photo courtesy of the family)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsOntario’s Ministry of Education is battling an Ottawa family before the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal who filed a complaint aimed at banning the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes in schools across the province.The complaint was filed this past December by Jean-Paul Allard on behalf of his eight year-old daughter Isabela Courchene. The case is headed for mediation on September 7. The complaint alleges the Ministry of Education is discriminating against Indigenous students by allowing the use of clothing that stereotypes their culture or displays racial slurs.Allard, an educational assistant with the Catholic School Board in Ottawa whose wife Lynne Courchene is from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba, said allowing the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes or slurs contravenes the province’s Safe Schools Act, which guarantees a safe learning environment for all students.“What is there to mediate? There is Bill 81, the Safe Schools Act, which clearly states that all members of the school community are supposed to be treated with respect and dignity,” said Allard. “I don’t see how allowing students to wear clothing that has the stereotypical images of First Nations or a slur on it like ‘Redmen’ or ‘Redskins’ is in line with that policy…. Either you are offering First Nations students equal protection under these laws or you’re not.”Ontario has asked the tribunal to dismiss the complaint arguing it is up to individual school boards to set policies around clothing.“The ministry is not liable for the operational decisions of individual school boards or schools. School boards, not the ministry, are responsible for ensuring their own compliance with the (Human Rights Code),” said Ontario’s submission before the tribunal. “Including imposing any limits on wearing clothing displaying Indigenous themed team mascots, logos or names in their schools that are required to comply with the Code.”Ontario’s submission also stated Education Minister Mitzie Hunter wrote the chairs of Ontario’s school boards on Jan. 18 requesting they review potentially offensive team logos and mascots with local Indigenous “partners.” That same day, the ministry’s deputy minister wrote the province’s directors of education to do the same, according to the submission filed in March.Courchene said it is up to the provincial ministry to set the standard and the issue is one of fundamental human rights.“We want to be treated equally as any other minority group. Our kids deserve that and they deserve to go to a school where there is no disrespect and they’ll feel welcomed going in,” said Courchene. “We want a ruling that…says we are going to ban all the clothing accessories and the names of teams that are offensive to people…. The only way that actual reconciliation can truly happen is through children and teaching them from a young age that it is not acceptable.”(Isabela Courchene, 8. Photo courtesy of the family.)Courchene said she decided to act on the issue in November 2015 when she was out shopping with three of her four children in an Ottawa suburb and crossed paths with a children’s hockey team from Sudbury, Ont. The players were all wearing their red team tracksuits with a TD Bank trademark, a logo resembling the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks along with their team name: Copper Cliff Redmen.“It was so normal, so ingrained in people that no one took a second glance at what was said on their shirts. It is so ingrained in society that there is nothing wrong with this,” said Courchene. “There is no problem with Aboriginal people being used a mascot or a stereotype and that sort of proves it right there.”Courchene said she has written support from several First Nations in Ontario, but is waiting for permission to release their names.The band council from the Iroquois community of Six Nations, which has the largest population of any reserve in Canada, passed a motion last September supporting the human rights complaint.Courchene said she is still working on building more support.“We want to raise enough awareness so (Ontario) can’t turn around at mediation and say it’s only us,” she said. “We are trying to overwhelmingly show them that this is not the case. If we are armed with other First Nations saying that they don’t agree with this and they don’t think that it is okay and they want this to be changed, then we are hoping when (Ontario gets) there they will see that and they won’t be able to wiggle out of it.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

first_img(Lynne Courchene and Jean-Paul Allard are behind an Ontario human rights complaint. Photo courtesy of the family)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsOntario’s Ministry of Education is battling an Ottawa family before the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal who filed a complaint aimed at banning the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes in schools across the province.The complaint was filed this past December by Jean-Paul Allard on behalf of his eight year-old daughter Isabela Courchene. The case is headed for mediation on September 7. The complaint alleges the Ministry of Education is discriminating against Indigenous students by allowing the use of clothing that stereotypes their culture or displays racial slurs.Allard, an educational assistant with the Catholic School Board in Ottawa whose wife Lynne Courchene is from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba, said allowing the use of clothing depicting Indigenous stereotypes or slurs contravenes the province’s Safe Schools Act, which guarantees a safe learning environment for all students.“What is there to mediate? There is Bill 81, the Safe Schools Act, which clearly states that all members of the school community are supposed to be treated with respect and dignity,” said Allard. “I don’t see how allowing students to wear clothing that has the stereotypical images of First Nations or a slur on it like ‘Redmen’ or ‘Redskins’ is in line with that policy…. Either you are offering First Nations students equal protection under these laws or you’re not.”Ontario has asked the tribunal to dismiss the complaint arguing it is up to individual school boards to set policies around clothing.“The ministry is not liable for the operational decisions of individual school boards or schools. School boards, not the ministry, are responsible for ensuring their own compliance with the (Human Rights Code),” said Ontario’s submission before the tribunal. “Including imposing any limits on wearing clothing displaying Indigenous themed team mascots, logos or names in their schools that are required to comply with the Code.”Ontario’s submission also stated Education Minister Mitzie Hunter wrote the chairs of Ontario’s school boards on Jan. 18 requesting they review potentially offensive team logos and mascots with local Indigenous “partners.” That same day, the ministry’s deputy minister wrote the province’s directors of education to do the same, according to the submission filed in March.Courchene said it is up to the provincial ministry to set the standard and the issue is one of fundamental human rights.“We want to be treated equally as any other minority group. Our kids deserve that and they deserve to go to a school where there is no disrespect and they’ll feel welcomed going in,” said Courchene. “We want a ruling that…says we are going to ban all the clothing accessories and the names of teams that are offensive to people…. The only way that actual reconciliation can truly happen is through children and teaching them from a young age that it is not acceptable.”(Isabela Courchene, 8. Photo courtesy of the family.)Courchene said she decided to act on the issue in November 2015 when she was out shopping with three of her four children in an Ottawa suburb and crossed paths with a children’s hockey team from Sudbury, Ont. The players were all wearing their red team tracksuits with a TD Bank trademark, a logo resembling the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks along with their team name: Copper Cliff Redmen.“It was so normal, so ingrained in people that no one took a second glance at what was said on their shirts. It is so ingrained in society that there is nothing wrong with this,” said Courchene. “There is no problem with Aboriginal people being used a mascot or a stereotype and that sort of proves it right there.”Courchene said she has written support from several First Nations in Ontario, but is waiting for permission to release their names.The band council from the Iroquois community of Six Nations, which has the largest population of any reserve in Canada, passed a motion last September supporting the human rights complaint.Courchene said she is still working on building more support.“We want to raise enough awareness so (Ontario) can’t turn around at mediation and say it’s only us,” she said. “We are trying to overwhelmingly show them that this is not the case. If we are armed with other First Nations saying that they don’t agree with this and they don’t think that it is okay and they want this to be changed, then we are hoping when (Ontario gets) there they will see that and they won’t be able to wiggle out of it.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Chief urges Manitoba Hydro to scrap challenge against electricity rate freeze for

14 Oct 2019

first_imgAPTN NewsThe Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs (AMC) is calling on Manitoba Hydro to roll back its challenge against an order to freeze electricity rates for First Nations communities in the province.A month ago the Public Utilities Board (PUB) ruled Hydro must create an “On Reserve First Nations” customer class with no rate increase for the coming year to deal with what it calls energy poverty.Now the Crown corporation is challenging the order, a move Grand Chief Arlen Dumas calls “unfortunate.”“The Public Utilities Board’s decision to create a new First Nations on-reserve rate was an important step towards alleviating energy poverty,” he said. “At a time when Manitoba Hydro and governments are constantly talking about reconciliation, it’s unfortunate that they would try to overturn this important decision.“AMC is calling on Hydro to withdraw its application to stay the PUBs order, and is considering all of its legal options to protect the order.”Hydro argues the utilities board does not have the legal authority to make this kind of ruling.According to the Manitoba Hydro Act, the rates charged for power supplied to a class of grid customers “shall be the same throughout the province.”Scott Powell, director of corporate communications for Manitoba Hydro, said the PUB is possibly ordering the Crown corporation to do something illegal.“We understand the case for energy poverty. We understand it’s an issue. But that isn’t the issue for us in this particular case,” he said, adding it’s a jurisdictional and legal issue.“I don’t think any one of our customers would expect us to operate outside the law.”A panel will now be put in place to resolve the dispute.If Hydro is unsuccessful it can go to court.The board’s ruling from May 1 increased rates by 3.6 per cent on average, less than the 7.9 per cent requested by Hydro.At the time, Hydro said it’s projecting debt levels of up to $27 billion.-With files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgAPTN NewsThe Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs (AMC) is calling on Manitoba Hydro to roll back its challenge against an order to freeze electricity rates for First Nations communities in the province.A month ago the Public Utilities Board (PUB) ruled Hydro must create an “On Reserve First Nations” customer class with no rate increase for the coming year to deal with what it calls energy poverty.Now the Crown corporation is challenging the order, a move Grand Chief Arlen Dumas calls “unfortunate.”“The Public Utilities Board’s decision to create a new First Nations on-reserve rate was an important step towards alleviating energy poverty,” he said. “At a time when Manitoba Hydro and governments are constantly talking about reconciliation, it’s unfortunate that they would try to overturn this important decision.“AMC is calling on Hydro to withdraw its application to stay the PUBs order, and is considering all of its legal options to protect the order.”Hydro argues the utilities board does not have the legal authority to make this kind of ruling.According to the Manitoba Hydro Act, the rates charged for power supplied to a class of grid customers “shall be the same throughout the province.”Scott Powell, director of corporate communications for Manitoba Hydro, said the PUB is possibly ordering the Crown corporation to do something illegal.“We understand the case for energy poverty. We understand it’s an issue. But that isn’t the issue for us in this particular case,” he said, adding it’s a jurisdictional and legal issue.“I don’t think any one of our customers would expect us to operate outside the law.”A panel will now be put in place to resolve the dispute.If Hydro is unsuccessful it can go to court.The board’s ruling from May 1 increased rates by 3.6 per cent on average, less than the 7.9 per cent requested by Hydro.At the time, Hydro said it’s projecting debt levels of up to $27 billion.-With files from The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Honda says it is recalling 437K vehicles for fuelpump issue

12 Oct 2019

TORRANCE, Calif. — Honda says it is recalling 437,000 vehicles in the U.S. to fix a fuel-pump issue.The recall covers model-year 2016-2018 Acura MDXs, 2015-2019 Acura TLX V6s and 2015-2017 Honda Accord V6s.The automaker says the vehicles’ software needs to be updated, and in some cases, have their fuel pumps replaced.That’s because sodium particulates in some U.S. gasoline can stick to internal components in the fuel pumps, reducing the pumps’ performance. In hot weather, this could limit the vehicle’s acceleration or cause its engine to stall, increasing the risk of a crash.Honda says it has received no reports of crashes or injuries because of the issue.Owners will be notified by letter in late March, after which they are advised to take the vehicles to authorized dealers.The Associated Press read more

TORRANCE, Calif. — Honda says it is recalling 437,000 vehicles in the U.S. to fix a fuel-pump issue.The recall covers model-year 2016-2018 Acura MDXs, 2015-2019 Acura TLX V6s and 2015-2017 Honda Accord V6s.The automaker says the vehicles’ software needs to be updated, and in some cases, have their fuel pumps replaced.That’s because sodium particulates in some U.S. gasoline can stick to internal components in the fuel pumps, reducing the pumps’ performance. In hot weather, this could limit the vehicle’s acceleration or cause its engine to stall, increasing the risk of a crash.Honda says it has received no reports of crashes or injuries because of the issue.Owners will be notified by letter in late March, after which they are advised to take the vehicles to authorized dealers.The Associated Press read more

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World Health Day UN urges countries to prioritize combat against vectorborne diseases

02 Oct 2019

“Every year, more than 1 million people die from diseases carried by mosquitoes, flies and other insects, such as triatomine bugs. These vector-borne diseases – which include malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis – cause chronic illness and immense suffering for hundreds of millions more,” says Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in his message for the Day, which is observed every year on 7 April to mark the founding in 1948 of the UN World Health Organization (WHO). Mr. Ban says that climate change, altered habitats and increased international trade and travel are exposing more people to the vectors that transmit these diseases. They present a risk in all regions, including countries where the threat had formerly been eradicated, but the most affected are the world’s poorest people, especially those who live in remote rural communities far from health services or in urban shanty towns. “By profoundly affecting people’s health, vector-borne diseases are a serious impediment to poverty reduction and sustainable development,” he said, stressing that work to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and define a post-2015 development agenda must recognize that investing in vector control and disease prevention is both wise and necessary. While stressing that sustained political commitment can save millions of lives and yield substantial social and economic returns, he said that it is also important to recognize that vector control goes beyond the health sector. “Poorly planned development initiatives such as forest clearance, dam construction or irrigation to boost food production may increase the disease burden,” he explains. By tackling such issues through an integrated, coherent and united effort across many sectors, including environment, agriculture, water and sanitation, urban planning and education, this serious but eminently preventable threat could be effectively controlled. “On this World Health Day, I urge countries and development partners to make vector control a priority,” declared the Secretary-General. For its part, WHO is highlighting the serious and increasing threat of vector-borne diseases, with the slogan: “Small bite, big threat” . The agency’s newly published global brief on vector-borne diseases outlines steps that governments, community groups and families can all take to protect people from infection.“A global health agenda that gives higher priority to vector control could save many lives and avert much suffering. Simple, cost-effective interventions like insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor spraying have already saved millions of lives,” says Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “No one in the 21st century should die from the bite of a mosquito, a sandfly, a blackfly or a tick.”Echoing the Secretary-General’s concerns, WHO stresses that environmental changes, a massive increase in international travel and trade, changes in agricultural practices and rapid unplanned urbanization are causing an increase in the number and spread of many vectors worldwide and making new groups of people, notably tourists and business travellers, vulnerable.Mosquito-borne dengue, for example, is now found in 100 countries, putting more than 2.5 billion people – over 40 per cent of the world’s population – at risk. Dengue has recently been reported in China, Portugal and the state of Florida, in the United States, WHO says. With these concerns in mind, Dr. Jacob Kumaresan, Executive Director of WHO’s New York Office, offers some simple steps than can protect people, their families and the environment – get vaccinated, use insect repellent, sleep under an insecticide-treated bed net, wear light-colored, long-sleeved shirts and trousers, install window screens and get rid of stagnant water from places where mosquitoes breed, such as old containers, flower pots and used tires. “Vector control remains the most important tool in preventing outbreaks of vector-borne diseases,” says Dr. Lorenzo Savioli, Director of WHO’s Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases. “Increased funds and political commitment are needed to sustain existing vector-control tools, as well as medicines and diagnostic tools – and to conduct urgently needed research.”Picking up that thread, John Ashe, President of the UN General Assembly, said in his message: “Sustained political commitment and financial backing aimed at amplifying the global effort would save millions of more lives and protect over a billion people against needless suffering.” He reminded UN Member States, civil society, the private sector and other stakeholders that everyone needs to act against this threat to human health and development. “Let us work together to make vector control and disease prevention a priority in the global health agenda.” read more

“Every year, more than 1 million people die from diseases carried by mosquitoes, flies and other insects, such as triatomine bugs. These vector-borne diseases – which include malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis – cause chronic illness and immense suffering for hundreds of millions more,” says Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in his message for the Day, which is observed every year on 7 April to mark the founding in 1948 of the UN World Health Organization (WHO). Mr. Ban says that climate change, altered habitats and increased international trade and travel are exposing more people to the vectors that transmit these diseases. They present a risk in all regions, including countries where the threat had formerly been eradicated, but the most affected are the world’s poorest people, especially those who live in remote rural communities far from health services or in urban shanty towns. “By profoundly affecting people’s health, vector-borne diseases are a serious impediment to poverty reduction and sustainable development,” he said, stressing that work to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and define a post-2015 development agenda must recognize that investing in vector control and disease prevention is both wise and necessary. While stressing that sustained political commitment can save millions of lives and yield substantial social and economic returns, he said that it is also important to recognize that vector control goes beyond the health sector. “Poorly planned development initiatives such as forest clearance, dam construction or irrigation to boost food production may increase the disease burden,” he explains. By tackling such issues through an integrated, coherent and united effort across many sectors, including environment, agriculture, water and sanitation, urban planning and education, this serious but eminently preventable threat could be effectively controlled. “On this World Health Day, I urge countries and development partners to make vector control a priority,” declared the Secretary-General. For its part, WHO is highlighting the serious and increasing threat of vector-borne diseases, with the slogan: “Small bite, big threat” . The agency’s newly published global brief on vector-borne diseases outlines steps that governments, community groups and families can all take to protect people from infection.“A global health agenda that gives higher priority to vector control could save many lives and avert much suffering. Simple, cost-effective interventions like insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor spraying have already saved millions of lives,” says Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “No one in the 21st century should die from the bite of a mosquito, a sandfly, a blackfly or a tick.”Echoing the Secretary-General’s concerns, WHO stresses that environmental changes, a massive increase in international travel and trade, changes in agricultural practices and rapid unplanned urbanization are causing an increase in the number and spread of many vectors worldwide and making new groups of people, notably tourists and business travellers, vulnerable.Mosquito-borne dengue, for example, is now found in 100 countries, putting more than 2.5 billion people – over 40 per cent of the world’s population – at risk. Dengue has recently been reported in China, Portugal and the state of Florida, in the United States, WHO says. With these concerns in mind, Dr. Jacob Kumaresan, Executive Director of WHO’s New York Office, offers some simple steps than can protect people, their families and the environment – get vaccinated, use insect repellent, sleep under an insecticide-treated bed net, wear light-colored, long-sleeved shirts and trousers, install window screens and get rid of stagnant water from places where mosquitoes breed, such as old containers, flower pots and used tires. “Vector control remains the most important tool in preventing outbreaks of vector-borne diseases,” says Dr. Lorenzo Savioli, Director of WHO’s Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases. “Increased funds and political commitment are needed to sustain existing vector-control tools, as well as medicines and diagnostic tools – and to conduct urgently needed research.”Picking up that thread, John Ashe, President of the UN General Assembly, said in his message: “Sustained political commitment and financial backing aimed at amplifying the global effort would save millions of more lives and protect over a billion people against needless suffering.” He reminded UN Member States, civil society, the private sector and other stakeholders that everyone needs to act against this threat to human health and development. “Let us work together to make vector control and disease prevention a priority in the global health agenda.” read more

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UK car manufacturing falls in July but YTD performance relatively steady

02 Oct 2019

UK car production declined -11.0% in July, according to figures released today by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT). 121,051 units left production lines as a raft of factors, including model changes, seasonal and operational adjustments and preparation for the introduction of the tough new emissions standards, affected output.Production for export in the month fell -4.2%, while -35.0% fewer cars were built for the UK market. However, the declines follow a particularly strong July in 2017 when the launch of several new models boosted output by almost 10,000 units and resulted in a substantial 17.7% rise in British demand for the month.In the year to date, the sector remains broadly on track to meet 2018 expectations, with 955,453 cars built in the first seven months. While production for the UK is currently down -16.0% compared with the same period last year, exports remain strong, dipping by a more moderate -1.2% and accounting for 81.3% of all output.Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive, said,While the industry is undoubtedly feeling the effects of recent uncertainty in the domestic market, drawing long term conclusions from monthly snapshots requires a health warning.The bigger picture is complex and month by month fluctuations are inevitable as manufacturers manage product cycles, operational changes and the delicate balance of supply and demand from market to market.To ensure future growth, we need political and economic clarity at home, and the continuation of beneficial trading arrangements with the EU and other key markets.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) UK car output declines -11.0% in July, with 121,051 units produced.Production for home market falls -35.0%, with more moderate -4.2% dip in exports.YTD performance in line with forecasts, with almost 1m cars leaving production lines – 81.3% for export. read more

UK car production declined -11.0% in July, according to figures released today by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT). 121,051 units left production lines as a raft of factors, including model changes, seasonal and operational adjustments and preparation for the introduction of the tough new emissions standards, affected output.Production for export in the month fell -4.2%, while -35.0% fewer cars were built for the UK market. However, the declines follow a particularly strong July in 2017 when the launch of several new models boosted output by almost 10,000 units and resulted in a substantial 17.7% rise in British demand for the month.In the year to date, the sector remains broadly on track to meet 2018 expectations, with 955,453 cars built in the first seven months. While production for the UK is currently down -16.0% compared with the same period last year, exports remain strong, dipping by a more moderate -1.2% and accounting for 81.3% of all output.Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive, said,While the industry is undoubtedly feeling the effects of recent uncertainty in the domestic market, drawing long term conclusions from monthly snapshots requires a health warning.The bigger picture is complex and month by month fluctuations are inevitable as manufacturers manage product cycles, operational changes and the delicate balance of supply and demand from market to market.To ensure future growth, we need political and economic clarity at home, and the continuation of beneficial trading arrangements with the EU and other key markets.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) UK car output declines -11.0% in July, with 121,051 units produced.Production for home market falls -35.0%, with more moderate -4.2% dip in exports.YTD performance in line with forecasts, with almost 1m cars leaving production lines – 81.3% for export. read more

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Football Binjimen Victor takes his turn in the spotlight

28 Sep 2019

Ohio State junior wide receiver Binjimen Victor (9) runs the ball in for a touchdown in the fourth quarter of the game against Penn State on Sept. 29. Ohio State won 27-26. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorWith a 26-14 deficit to overcome with eight minutes to go in the fourth quarter, the Ohio State wide receivers knew they had a job to do. Redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins had trouble getting the ball downfield against the Penn State secondary, completing 15 of 29 pass attempts for 132 yards with a touchdown and an interception through the first three quarters of the game. With a veteran group, the receivers did what their goal has been with the first-time quarterback all season: to have his back. With a 12-point deficit and no momentum, it was not a matter of when it would happen. As a group, they said they knew it would happen. It was a matter of who. That’s when Binjimen Victor came into the picture. Haskins trotted onto the field for the second drive of the second quarter, quickly recorded completions to two wide receivers, senior C.J. Saunders and junior Austin Mack. After an incompletion to Mack, Haskins saw something in the Penn State defense he had been preparing for. “I look back and if we got a certain pressure, which we did get that pressure, we were going to change the play and I look back and Coach [Ryan] Day said ‘Run it,’” Haskins said. “I see it coming and I don’t know what to do, so I snap the ball, I see it coming, I pulled up and I see Ben and I was like, ‘I have to make a play.’” Victor said he was running through the middle on a dig route and was not even the primary receiver on the play. The junior receiver had to look back to him to see if a play could be made. However, as the ball came to him, Victor felt as though his time had come. “I just had to make a play for my team,” Victor said. “I just felt I had to put it on my back.” Victor caught the overthrown ball in the air with a defender draped on his leg, trying to bring him down, The receiver shook him off and, according to Victor, all he saw was green grass, and took off. However, it wasn’t all green grass for Victor. With defenders coming after him in the open field, redshirt senior wide receivers Johnnie Dixon and Parris Campbell each picked a man and kept him away from their teammate. For Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer, the combination of the catch and the block brought life back into the Ohio State sideline. “It gave the whole sideline hope,” Meyer said. “Defense gets the ball back to the offense, even though it’s way down deep in there and then one of the great drives in Ohio State history.”Victor scored on the 47-yard play, bringing Ohio State within one score halfway through the fourth quarter.The Buckeyes would eventually beat the No. 9 Nittany Lions 27-26, with Victor’s play standing out as the key moment in the comeback. Meyer said it was nothing new. The head coach called Victor a very good practice player, saying the junior has never really lived up to his potential, never really had his turn in the spotlight. For Haskins, these are the kinds of catches he and Victor practice on a daily basis. “He’s a freaky athlete,” Haskins said. “Every Sunday, we work on 2-minute drills and situations like that. He makes those catches every day, so this is the time to do it in the game and it really came up big.” Victor knew someone had to make a play. It came with many parts, but instead of him making the blocks, leading the way for another receiver’s highlight, it was his chance. “You know, when I got a chance, you only get a couple,” Victor said. “You just have to make it pay.” For Meyer, that play is not only game-altering, keeping Ohio State on the path it was initially scheduled to be on. He thinks Victor’s catch could be career changing. “That’s the biggest play of anybody’s career, that one,” Meyer said. read more

Ohio State junior wide receiver Binjimen Victor (9) runs the ball in for a touchdown in the fourth quarter of the game against Penn State on Sept. 29. Ohio State won 27-26. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorWith a 26-14 deficit to overcome with eight minutes to go in the fourth quarter, the Ohio State wide receivers knew they had a job to do. Redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins had trouble getting the ball downfield against the Penn State secondary, completing 15 of 29 pass attempts for 132 yards with a touchdown and an interception through the first three quarters of the game. With a veteran group, the receivers did what their goal has been with the first-time quarterback all season: to have his back. With a 12-point deficit and no momentum, it was not a matter of when it would happen. As a group, they said they knew it would happen. It was a matter of who. That’s when Binjimen Victor came into the picture. Haskins trotted onto the field for the second drive of the second quarter, quickly recorded completions to two wide receivers, senior C.J. Saunders and junior Austin Mack. After an incompletion to Mack, Haskins saw something in the Penn State defense he had been preparing for. “I look back and if we got a certain pressure, which we did get that pressure, we were going to change the play and I look back and Coach [Ryan] Day said ‘Run it,’” Haskins said. “I see it coming and I don’t know what to do, so I snap the ball, I see it coming, I pulled up and I see Ben and I was like, ‘I have to make a play.’” Victor said he was running through the middle on a dig route and was not even the primary receiver on the play. The junior receiver had to look back to him to see if a play could be made. However, as the ball came to him, Victor felt as though his time had come. “I just had to make a play for my team,” Victor said. “I just felt I had to put it on my back.” Victor caught the overthrown ball in the air with a defender draped on his leg, trying to bring him down, The receiver shook him off and, according to Victor, all he saw was green grass, and took off. However, it wasn’t all green grass for Victor. With defenders coming after him in the open field, redshirt senior wide receivers Johnnie Dixon and Parris Campbell each picked a man and kept him away from their teammate. For Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer, the combination of the catch and the block brought life back into the Ohio State sideline. “It gave the whole sideline hope,” Meyer said. “Defense gets the ball back to the offense, even though it’s way down deep in there and then one of the great drives in Ohio State history.”Victor scored on the 47-yard play, bringing Ohio State within one score halfway through the fourth quarter.The Buckeyes would eventually beat the No. 9 Nittany Lions 27-26, with Victor’s play standing out as the key moment in the comeback. Meyer said it was nothing new. The head coach called Victor a very good practice player, saying the junior has never really lived up to his potential, never really had his turn in the spotlight. For Haskins, these are the kinds of catches he and Victor practice on a daily basis. “He’s a freaky athlete,” Haskins said. “Every Sunday, we work on 2-minute drills and situations like that. He makes those catches every day, so this is the time to do it in the game and it really came up big.” Victor knew someone had to make a play. It came with many parts, but instead of him making the blocks, leading the way for another receiver’s highlight, it was his chance. “You know, when I got a chance, you only get a couple,” Victor said. “You just have to make it pay.” For Meyer, that play is not only game-altering, keeping Ohio State on the path it was initially scheduled to be on. He thinks Victor’s catch could be career changing. “That’s the biggest play of anybody’s career, that one,” Meyer said. read more

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Cats are nice and enjoy spending time with humans study finds

25 Sep 2019

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The researchers took 50 cats from shelters and peoples homes and deprived them of food, human contact, scent and toys for a few hours.They then introduced them to stimuli within these four categories to see what they chose.Most cats chose human socialisation over any of the other categories.The authors of the study wrote: “While it has been suggested that cat sociality exists on a continuum, perhaps skewed toward independency, we have found that 50% of cats tested preferred interaction with the social stimulus even though they had a direct choice between social interaction with a human and their other most preferred stimuli from the three other stimulus categories.” Dog lovers always tell cat lovers that while the latter animal smells less, doesn’t need walking and is arguably more intelligent, they don’t like humans and are fundamentally selfish.Cataholics have been vindicated, however, by a new study which relays the cheering news that cats don’t just enjoy human company – they pick it over food.New research from Oregon State University, published on Friday in Behavioural Processes, concludes that cats enjoy human contact more than eating.Dispelling the rumour that cats are antisocial and the only love they show is cupboard love, they subjected cats to a series of tests to prove what they choose in different situations.last_img read more

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The researchers took 50 cats from shelters and peoples homes and deprived them of food, human contact, scent and toys for a few hours.They then introduced them to stimuli within these four categories to see what they chose.Most cats chose human socialisation over any of the other categories.The authors of the study wrote: “While it has been suggested that cat sociality exists on a continuum, perhaps skewed toward independency, we have found that 50% of cats tested preferred interaction with the social stimulus even though they had a direct choice between social interaction with a human and their other most preferred stimuli from the three other stimulus categories.” Dog lovers always tell cat lovers that while the latter animal smells less, doesn’t need walking and is arguably more intelligent, they don’t like humans and are fundamentally selfish.Cataholics have been vindicated, however, by a new study which relays the cheering news that cats don’t just enjoy human company – they pick it over food.New research from Oregon State University, published on Friday in Behavioural Processes, concludes that cats enjoy human contact more than eating.Dispelling the rumour that cats are antisocial and the only love they show is cupboard love, they subjected cats to a series of tests to prove what they choose in different situations.last_img read more

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Police investigating Puruni Landing murder of porknocker

25 Sep 2019

Police are currently investigating the death of a porknocker who resides at  Waramuri Mission, Moruca River, North West District who was allegedly murdered on Sunday at Puruni Landing, Region 7, Cuyuni-Mazaruni.Dead is 24-year-old Xavier Boyal.He was reportedly killed by a 26-year-old resident of Charlestown who has since been identified by investigators as Deion Evans, called ‘Rasta Beans’.Boyal who was working with a dredge owner at Rock Creek, Puruni River died sometime around 03:00 and 03:45 at Puruni Landing.According to information received, at about 21:00hrs on the date in question Boyal left the camp in company of his coworker to a pub at Puruni Landing where it is alleged that the coworker had an altercation with an unknown male when Boyal intervened and pushed the unknown male away.Thereafter both of them decided to walk back to camp along the Puruni Road.It was reported that the suspect, Evans caught up with the men in a vehicle driven by another and pulled out a black handgun from his pants waist, pointed it towards the direction of Boyal and opened fire, causing him to fall to the ground.This publication understands that the suspect then exited the vehicle and discharged another round at Boyal and made good his escape.Boyal’s body bore three gunshot wounds, one above the abdomen, one under the right arm and another to the right upper back.A warhead was found about 15 feet from where the body was.The shooter is yet to be apprehended. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedPolice ranks arrested for murder of Brazilian minerAugust 12, 2018In “Crime”Miner stabbed to death during scuffle at Puruni LandingJuly 9, 2019In “Crime”Teen miner fatally stabbed by drunk employerMarch 23, 2019In “Crime” read more

Police are currently investigating the death of a porknocker who resides at  Waramuri Mission, Moruca River, North West District who was allegedly murdered on Sunday at Puruni Landing, Region 7, Cuyuni-Mazaruni.Dead is 24-year-old Xavier Boyal.He was reportedly killed by a 26-year-old resident of Charlestown who has since been identified by investigators as Deion Evans, called ‘Rasta Beans’.Boyal who was working with a dredge owner at Rock Creek, Puruni River died sometime around 03:00 and 03:45 at Puruni Landing.According to information received, at about 21:00hrs on the date in question Boyal left the camp in company of his coworker to a pub at Puruni Landing where it is alleged that the coworker had an altercation with an unknown male when Boyal intervened and pushed the unknown male away.Thereafter both of them decided to walk back to camp along the Puruni Road.It was reported that the suspect, Evans caught up with the men in a vehicle driven by another and pulled out a black handgun from his pants waist, pointed it towards the direction of Boyal and opened fire, causing him to fall to the ground.This publication understands that the suspect then exited the vehicle and discharged another round at Boyal and made good his escape.Boyal’s body bore three gunshot wounds, one above the abdomen, one under the right arm and another to the right upper back.A warhead was found about 15 feet from where the body was.The shooter is yet to be apprehended. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedPolice ranks arrested for murder of Brazilian minerAugust 12, 2018In “Crime”Miner stabbed to death during scuffle at Puruni LandingJuly 9, 2019In “Crime”Teen miner fatally stabbed by drunk employerMarch 23, 2019In “Crime” read more

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Sony leaps into virtual reality by announcing Playstation 4 headset

22 Sep 2019

first_imgSONY HAS UNVEILED a new prototype for a virtual reality headset for its Playstation 4 console;Project Morpheus, which was revealed at the Game Developers Conference 2014 (GDC), is a head-mounted display with 1080p resolution and a 90 degree field of view.It has both an accelerometer and gyroscope sensor as well as Playstation Camera built into the unit to help track movement.The device also includes 3D audio technology which recreates stereoscopic sound in all directions so when the player moves their head, the virtual world rotates with them.The president of Sony’s Worldwide Studios, Shuhei Yoshida, said the company had been working on the technology for three years. I have long dreamed about VR and the possibilities it brings in regards to game development. This new technology will deliver a sense of presence, where you as the player actually feel like you’re inside the game and your emotions feel that much more real.The prototype will be used as the first development kit for Playstation 4 developers who wish to incorporate the technology into their upcoming games.No commercial release date was given for the device, but those at GDC 2014 will be able to play a number of demos using the headset such as the reboot of Thief, Eve Valkyrie, a multiplayer space dogfighting game, The Castle, a medieval combat game and The Deep, which sees players descending into a diving cage where they encounter deadly creatures.While it’s designed specifically for the Playstation 4, Project Morpheus isn’t the only virtual reality headset. The Oculus Rift has been steadily gaining traction since it raised just under $2.5 million on Kickstarter back in 2012 and is expected to be released in late 2014/early 2015.Read: Play Skyrim? The developer is hiring 250 customer support jobs in Galway >Read: Xbox One launching in 26 more countries in September >last_img read more

first_imgSONY HAS UNVEILED a new prototype for a virtual reality headset for its Playstation 4 console;Project Morpheus, which was revealed at the Game Developers Conference 2014 (GDC), is a head-mounted display with 1080p resolution and a 90 degree field of view.It has both an accelerometer and gyroscope sensor as well as Playstation Camera built into the unit to help track movement.The device also includes 3D audio technology which recreates stereoscopic sound in all directions so when the player moves their head, the virtual world rotates with them.The president of Sony’s Worldwide Studios, Shuhei Yoshida, said the company had been working on the technology for three years. I have long dreamed about VR and the possibilities it brings in regards to game development. This new technology will deliver a sense of presence, where you as the player actually feel like you’re inside the game and your emotions feel that much more real.The prototype will be used as the first development kit for Playstation 4 developers who wish to incorporate the technology into their upcoming games.No commercial release date was given for the device, but those at GDC 2014 will be able to play a number of demos using the headset such as the reboot of Thief, Eve Valkyrie, a multiplayer space dogfighting game, The Castle, a medieval combat game and The Deep, which sees players descending into a diving cage where they encounter deadly creatures.While it’s designed specifically for the Playstation 4, Project Morpheus isn’t the only virtual reality headset. The Oculus Rift has been steadily gaining traction since it raised just under $2.5 million on Kickstarter back in 2012 and is expected to be released in late 2014/early 2015.Read: Play Skyrim? The developer is hiring 250 customer support jobs in Galway >Read: Xbox One launching in 26 more countries in September >last_img read more

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Viable device found in Co Antrim housing estate

22 Sep 2019

first_imgARMY TECHNICAL OFFICERS have declared the suspicious object that was found in Mallusk Gardens in Co Antrim to be a viable device.A security alert was issued in the area when the object was being examined. This has now ended and residents have been allowed to return to their homes.Police would ask anyone who may have any information about this incident to contact them at Antrim Police Station on 0044 845 600 8000.Alternatively, the independent charity Crimestoppers can be contacted anonymously on 0044 800 555 111.Read: Armagh man arrested over dissident republican activity >last_img

first_imgARMY TECHNICAL OFFICERS have declared the suspicious object that was found in Mallusk Gardens in Co Antrim to be a viable device.A security alert was issued in the area when the object was being examined. This has now ended and residents have been allowed to return to their homes.Police would ask anyone who may have any information about this incident to contact them at Antrim Police Station on 0044 845 600 8000.Alternatively, the independent charity Crimestoppers can be contacted anonymously on 0044 800 555 111.Read: Armagh man arrested over dissident republican activity >last_img

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24583 Hurt Locker pirates to be sued by Voltage Pictures

21 Sep 2019

first_imgVoltage Pictures, the publisher of award-winning movie The Hurt Locker has started the biggest ever BitTorrent piracy lawsuit yet seen. In total, 24,583 illegal downloads of the movie over BitTorrent have been targeted via IP addresses, and Voltage now plans to sue every single one of them for damages.This isn’t a new lawsuit, as it was started last year with only 5,000 alledged pirate downloads. But that figure has now jumped with a further 20,000 or so new downloads identified and added to the case.The users in question have yet to be formally identified by Voltage, but they are working with ISPs to find out who these people are. The majority of the pirates use Comcast, Verizon, Charter, and Time Warner for their Internet access.Although most ISPs are working with Voltage on matching IPs to customer accounts, the rate at which matches are being released means this could be a very lengthy pursuit for compensation. For example, Verizon will provide Voltage with 100 IP matches per month, but there are 5,239 IPs in total Voltage want details for from Verizon. That’s going to take a few decades.According to IMDb the movie took $12.6 million at the Box Office, suggesting that this lawsuit could end up earning the publisher more from pirate copies than legitimate sales. That’s assuming Voltage take the same view as most other lawsuits of this type and offer the pirate a settlement of a few thousand dollars to make it go away.Read more at TorrentFreakMatthew’s OpinionI doubt Voltage is going to be happy with just 100 IP matches a month or similar from other ISPs. That is surely going to have to change for the simple fact that ISPs can’t keep such details on record for decades. Will the ISPs be forced to keep them on file, speed up matches, or allowed to let that data be deleted therefore halting the Voltage lawsuit?The other thing to consider is just how many of these alledged pirates are actually innocent? Will any of them fight the claim and take Voltage’s costs up by continuing to pursue them? If enough do that then it may be deemed too expensive to continue with the lawsuit.last_img read more

first_imgVoltage Pictures, the publisher of award-winning movie The Hurt Locker has started the biggest ever BitTorrent piracy lawsuit yet seen. In total, 24,583 illegal downloads of the movie over BitTorrent have been targeted via IP addresses, and Voltage now plans to sue every single one of them for damages.This isn’t a new lawsuit, as it was started last year with only 5,000 alledged pirate downloads. But that figure has now jumped with a further 20,000 or so new downloads identified and added to the case.The users in question have yet to be formally identified by Voltage, but they are working with ISPs to find out who these people are. The majority of the pirates use Comcast, Verizon, Charter, and Time Warner for their Internet access.Although most ISPs are working with Voltage on matching IPs to customer accounts, the rate at which matches are being released means this could be a very lengthy pursuit for compensation. For example, Verizon will provide Voltage with 100 IP matches per month, but there are 5,239 IPs in total Voltage want details for from Verizon. That’s going to take a few decades.According to IMDb the movie took $12.6 million at the Box Office, suggesting that this lawsuit could end up earning the publisher more from pirate copies than legitimate sales. That’s assuming Voltage take the same view as most other lawsuits of this type and offer the pirate a settlement of a few thousand dollars to make it go away.Read more at TorrentFreakMatthew’s OpinionI doubt Voltage is going to be happy with just 100 IP matches a month or similar from other ISPs. That is surely going to have to change for the simple fact that ISPs can’t keep such details on record for decades. Will the ISPs be forced to keep them on file, speed up matches, or allowed to let that data be deleted therefore halting the Voltage lawsuit?The other thing to consider is just how many of these alledged pirates are actually innocent? Will any of them fight the claim and take Voltage’s costs up by continuing to pursue them? If enough do that then it may be deemed too expensive to continue with the lawsuit.last_img read more

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World Cup construction accident kills two

21 Sep 2019

first_imgTwo construction workers died when a giant crane came crashing to the ground at the Arena Corinthians in Brazil as they were preparing the stadium for next year’s World Cup. FIFA president Sepp Blatter expressed his sorrow and the world governing body pledged, along with the Local Organising Committee, to carry out a thorough investigation into the cause of the fatal accident. The stadium that is due to stage the opening match at next year’s FIFA World Cup was also damaged in the accident. World Cup host Brazil is due to play in the opening match at the stadium on 12 June, 2014, against an opponent to be determined at next month’s draw. It is also due to stage five further matches, including a semi-final. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img

first_imgTwo construction workers died when a giant crane came crashing to the ground at the Arena Corinthians in Brazil as they were preparing the stadium for next year’s World Cup. FIFA president Sepp Blatter expressed his sorrow and the world governing body pledged, along with the Local Organising Committee, to carry out a thorough investigation into the cause of the fatal accident. The stadium that is due to stage the opening match at next year’s FIFA World Cup was also damaged in the accident. World Cup host Brazil is due to play in the opening match at the stadium on 12 June, 2014, against an opponent to be determined at next month’s draw. It is also due to stage five further matches, including a semi-final. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img

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Japon une chasse à la baleine ni économique ni scientifique

20 Sep 2019

first_imgJapon : une chasse à la baleine ni économique, ni scientifique ? Alors que se poursuit à Jersey, jusqu’au jeudi 14 juillet, la 63e réunion de la Commission baleinière internationale (CBI), un politologue japonais, interrogé par l’AFP, estime que la chasse à la baleine toujours exercée par ses compatriotes répond à des critères psycho-sociaux bien plus que scientifiques ou économiques.Plutôt que de vrais partisans de la chasse à la baleine, “la majorité des Japonais sont des anti-anti-chasse : ils ne veulent pas (…) que les organisations anti-chasse leur disent ce qu’il faut faire”, nuance Atsuhsi Ishii, politologue à l’Université de Tohoku (Japon). D’après lui, il en va de même pour le gouvernement nippon : “selon moi, les autorités japonaises veulent se retirer de l’Antarctique. Mais ce n’est pas simple. Si nous le faisons, cela sera perçu comme une défaite contre les pays et les associations anti-chasse. Les politiciens ne sont pas vraiment prêts à accepter cela”, confie-t-il.Toujours selon ce chercheur, ni l’aspect économique, ni l’aspect ‘scientifique’ ne justifie le maintien de cette activité : “depuis des années, la viande de baleine ne se vend pas très bien. La réalité, c’est que l’industrie de la pêche n’en veut plus. [Et la chasse] génère des données scientifiques trop incertaines pour pouvoir être utilisées pour gérer la traque à la baleine”.Tolérée par la CBI mais décriée par les écologistes, la chasse ‘scientifique’ officiellement pratiquée par le Japon avait dû, en février dernier, se contenter de 170 prises (essentiellement des petits rorquals), soit 20 % du nombre prévu, à la suite des interventions répétées et musclées de l’ONG Sea Shepherd, dont les bateaux ont harcelé les baleiniers nippons en Antarctique.Les militants comptent poursuivre le combat À lire aussiUn satellite destiné à faire pleuvoir des météores sur commande va être envoyé dans l’espaceJustement, mardi, le fondateur de Sea Shepherd Paul Watson a affirmé que l’ONG reprendrait le harcèlement des navires japonais si ceux-ci retournaient capturer des cétacés l’hiver prochain.”S’il y avait un tremblement de terre en Colombie, serions-nous moins durs avec les trafiquants de cocaïne? La chasse japonaise est illégale, et le fait qu’ils aient connu une catastrophe naturelle n’est pas une raison, pour nous, d’arrêter notre opposition. S’ils retournent dans l’océan Austral, alors nous retournerons dans l’océan Austral”, clame le militant canadien cité par l’AFP.  Le 12 juillet 2011 à 18:27 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

first_imgJapon : une chasse à la baleine ni économique, ni scientifique ? Alors que se poursuit à Jersey, jusqu’au jeudi 14 juillet, la 63e réunion de la Commission baleinière internationale (CBI), un politologue japonais, interrogé par l’AFP, estime que la chasse à la baleine toujours exercée par ses compatriotes répond à des critères psycho-sociaux bien plus que scientifiques ou économiques.Plutôt que de vrais partisans de la chasse à la baleine, “la majorité des Japonais sont des anti-anti-chasse : ils ne veulent pas (…) que les organisations anti-chasse leur disent ce qu’il faut faire”, nuance Atsuhsi Ishii, politologue à l’Université de Tohoku (Japon). D’après lui, il en va de même pour le gouvernement nippon : “selon moi, les autorités japonaises veulent se retirer de l’Antarctique. Mais ce n’est pas simple. Si nous le faisons, cela sera perçu comme une défaite contre les pays et les associations anti-chasse. Les politiciens ne sont pas vraiment prêts à accepter cela”, confie-t-il.Toujours selon ce chercheur, ni l’aspect économique, ni l’aspect ‘scientifique’ ne justifie le maintien de cette activité : “depuis des années, la viande de baleine ne se vend pas très bien. La réalité, c’est que l’industrie de la pêche n’en veut plus. [Et la chasse] génère des données scientifiques trop incertaines pour pouvoir être utilisées pour gérer la traque à la baleine”.Tolérée par la CBI mais décriée par les écologistes, la chasse ‘scientifique’ officiellement pratiquée par le Japon avait dû, en février dernier, se contenter de 170 prises (essentiellement des petits rorquals), soit 20 % du nombre prévu, à la suite des interventions répétées et musclées de l’ONG Sea Shepherd, dont les bateaux ont harcelé les baleiniers nippons en Antarctique.Les militants comptent poursuivre le combat À lire aussiUn satellite destiné à faire pleuvoir des météores sur commande va être envoyé dans l’espaceJustement, mardi, le fondateur de Sea Shepherd Paul Watson a affirmé que l’ONG reprendrait le harcèlement des navires japonais si ceux-ci retournaient capturer des cétacés l’hiver prochain.”S’il y avait un tremblement de terre en Colombie, serions-nous moins durs avec les trafiquants de cocaïne? La chasse japonaise est illégale, et le fait qu’ils aient connu une catastrophe naturelle n’est pas une raison, pour nous, d’arrêter notre opposition. S’ils retournent dans l’océan Austral, alors nous retournerons dans l’océan Austral”, clame le militant canadien cité par l’AFP.  Le 12 juillet 2011 à 18:27 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Vancouver fire commanders OK contract

16 Sep 2019

first_imgThe city of Vancouver and its six-member fire command union settled a four-year contract Monday night.The new contract is retroactive to 2010, when the prior contract expired. The Fire Command Officers, Local 4378 represents the Vancouver Fire Department’s captains and battalion chiefs.The new contract includes no raises in 2010 or 2011, a 3.7 percent raise this year, and a 2 percent raise in 2013, Vancouver Deputy Human Resources Director Antoinette Gasbarre said. Those salary increases will cost the city a total of $62,729 in the next two years.In 2010, the average salary of a fire command union member was $137,814, including overtime and other factors.The fire commanders will also join the health care pool started by the larger Vancouver Fire Suppression unit, a move that caps Vancouver’s contribution to health care costs at a 5 percent increase a year.Effective April 1, the city will contribute $1,379.47 toward the health care premiums of fire commanders. Any cost over that must be covered by the union members.The city’s health care costs, much like those in the private sector, have grown in the double digits — so contributing to a separate pool allows officials to plan for set increases, rather than exponential growth, City Manager Eric Holmes has said.last_img read more

first_imgThe city of Vancouver and its six-member fire command union settled a four-year contract Monday night.The new contract is retroactive to 2010, when the prior contract expired. The Fire Command Officers, Local 4378 represents the Vancouver Fire Department’s captains and battalion chiefs.The new contract includes no raises in 2010 or 2011, a 3.7 percent raise this year, and a 2 percent raise in 2013, Vancouver Deputy Human Resources Director Antoinette Gasbarre said. Those salary increases will cost the city a total of $62,729 in the next two years.In 2010, the average salary of a fire command union member was $137,814, including overtime and other factors.The fire commanders will also join the health care pool started by the larger Vancouver Fire Suppression unit, a move that caps Vancouver’s contribution to health care costs at a 5 percent increase a year.Effective April 1, the city will contribute $1,379.47 toward the health care premiums of fire commanders. Any cost over that must be covered by the union members.The city’s health care costs, much like those in the private sector, have grown in the double digits — so contributing to a separate pool allows officials to plan for set increases, rather than exponential growth, City Manager Eric Holmes has said.last_img read more

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AL big shots mastermind questionpaper leak

03 Sep 2019

first_imgRuhul Kabir RizviBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi alleged on Sunday that the Awami League-led government is destroying country’s the education system in a planned manner.“The government is destroying one educational institution after another. Party activists are being taken into educational institutions through various unfair means,” said the BNP leader while addressing a press briefing at the party’s Naya Paltan headquarters in the capital.The BNP leader alleged that the government instructed the educational boards to make students pass the examination no matter what they write in the answer sheets.Read more: BCL leader expelled over DU entry test question leak“Besides, the mandate-less government is exploiting all means to destroy the morals of the students. Question-leak has now been a deadly disease which is destroying the education system,” BNP leader voiced concern.Alleging that the government high-ups are behind the question-paper leak, he said, “The trend of leaking out question papers is expanding by the day during the tenure of the present education minister [Nurul Islam Nahid].”The BNP leader alleged that the masterminds of question leak were not brought to book just because that they belong to the ruling quarters.“The incident of Friday’s question paper leak of Dhaka University’s D unit admission test is the very epitome of ruling party’s involvement in the unabated question-paper leak over the last ten years,” he said.Read more: BCL leader, 13 others held for cheating in DU entry testFourteen students, including a leader of ruling Bangladesh Awami League’s (AL) student wing Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL), were detained and remanded for their involvement in Friday’s question paper leak.Rizvi quoted a noted intellectual of the country without naming him as saying, the AL has turned Bangladesh into a criminal state.In response to a claim of prime minister Sheikh Hasina’s son Sajeeb Wazed Joy that Bangladesh has been a wonder of the world under the leadership of Hasina, Rizvi said Bangladesh will be destroyed if AL stays power for the next 10 to 15 years.last_img read more

first_imgRuhul Kabir RizviBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi alleged on Sunday that the Awami League-led government is destroying country’s the education system in a planned manner.“The government is destroying one educational institution after another. Party activists are being taken into educational institutions through various unfair means,” said the BNP leader while addressing a press briefing at the party’s Naya Paltan headquarters in the capital.The BNP leader alleged that the government instructed the educational boards to make students pass the examination no matter what they write in the answer sheets.Read more: BCL leader expelled over DU entry test question leak“Besides, the mandate-less government is exploiting all means to destroy the morals of the students. Question-leak has now been a deadly disease which is destroying the education system,” BNP leader voiced concern.Alleging that the government high-ups are behind the question-paper leak, he said, “The trend of leaking out question papers is expanding by the day during the tenure of the present education minister [Nurul Islam Nahid].”The BNP leader alleged that the masterminds of question leak were not brought to book just because that they belong to the ruling quarters.“The incident of Friday’s question paper leak of Dhaka University’s D unit admission test is the very epitome of ruling party’s involvement in the unabated question-paper leak over the last ten years,” he said.Read more: BCL leader, 13 others held for cheating in DU entry testFourteen students, including a leader of ruling Bangladesh Awami League’s (AL) student wing Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL), were detained and remanded for their involvement in Friday’s question paper leak.Rizvi quoted a noted intellectual of the country without naming him as saying, the AL has turned Bangladesh into a criminal state.In response to a claim of prime minister Sheikh Hasina’s son Sajeeb Wazed Joy that Bangladesh has been a wonder of the world under the leadership of Hasina, Rizvi said Bangladesh will be destroyed if AL stays power for the next 10 to 15 years.last_img read more

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Khusro on Sitar

31 Aug 2019

first_imgAzeem Ahmed Alvi,  one of India’s leading and Internationally known artist in world music. Born in the family of classical Indian the champion sitarist  will be performing at the 800th birthday celebration of Khwaja Hazrat Nizamuddin Aulia.  He will perform on the written ‘Kalma’ and on the invented ‘Raagas’  by Hazrat Amir Khusrow  a Sufi poet, scholar and also credited to have invented sitar and tabla will be brought live on stage by Sitar exponent. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Giving  his first live performance at the  age of twelve and  having been awarded a National Scholarship by the Government of India, Azeem Ahmed Alvi went on to perform at various prestigious music festivals across the world.Only in his twenties, he has established a strong foothold in the contemporary music scene both, in India and abroad. Already known to be one of the foremost sitar players of the world, he aspires to bridge the gap between Indian classical and western contemporary music. Through his musical expertise, he has dabbled in diverse genres like Sufi, Flamenco, Jazz, Electronica and Western Classical music. In 2012, he took his passion for traditional Indian music and the Sitar to a new level with the creation of his NGO, the Raag Mantra Music Foundation.The musician’s sole purpose has forever been to inculcate a sense of pride and joy for the traditional Indian music.When: December 31, 5:30- 7:30 pmWhere: Ghalib Academy, Hazrat Nizamuddinlast_img read more

first_imgAzeem Ahmed Alvi,  one of India’s leading and Internationally known artist in world music. Born in the family of classical Indian the champion sitarist  will be performing at the 800th birthday celebration of Khwaja Hazrat Nizamuddin Aulia.  He will perform on the written ‘Kalma’ and on the invented ‘Raagas’  by Hazrat Amir Khusrow  a Sufi poet, scholar and also credited to have invented sitar and tabla will be brought live on stage by Sitar exponent. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Giving  his first live performance at the  age of twelve and  having been awarded a National Scholarship by the Government of India, Azeem Ahmed Alvi went on to perform at various prestigious music festivals across the world.Only in his twenties, he has established a strong foothold in the contemporary music scene both, in India and abroad. Already known to be one of the foremost sitar players of the world, he aspires to bridge the gap between Indian classical and western contemporary music. Through his musical expertise, he has dabbled in diverse genres like Sufi, Flamenco, Jazz, Electronica and Western Classical music. In 2012, he took his passion for traditional Indian music and the Sitar to a new level with the creation of his NGO, the Raag Mantra Music Foundation.The musician’s sole purpose has forever been to inculcate a sense of pride and joy for the traditional Indian music.When: December 31, 5:30- 7:30 pmWhere: Ghalib Academy, Hazrat Nizamuddinlast_img read more

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The Art Games – 5 Artistic Competitions used to be Included in

30 Aug 2019

first_imgWhen Baron Pierre de Coubertin restarted the Olympics in 1896, he was adamant that it should emulate not just the physical sportsmanship of the original competition (albeit with less nudity) but should reflect what it truly meant to be an Olympian. For the baron, who was classically trained, a true Olympian was someone who was able to show prowess on the sports field and was able to hold their own when it came to artistic pursuits.Baron Pierre de Coubertin – a gold medal for literature at the 5th Summer Olympic Games, 1912 in Stockholm, for the Ode to Sport.It took the Baron almost ten years to convince the Olympic Committee to get on board with his vision for a well-rounded Olympic Games.The Baron was very much a man of conviction and declared at the time: “There is only one difference between our Olympiads and plain sporting championships, and it is precisely the contests of art as they existed in the Olympiads of Ancient Greece, where sports exhibitions walked in equality with artistic exhibitions.”Detail of unusual ancient rock wall design and pattern in Olympia, Greece where the first Olympics were held.By 1912, the Baron had successfully secured his dream and the first Olympics for art were held at the Stockholm Summer Games. There were five categories that could be entered, and all entries had to be related to sport in some way.The categories were: architecture, music, painting, sculpture and literature. The medal system worked in the same way as the physical sports with a gold, silver and bronze for each category.Cover of the official report for the 1896 Summer Olympics.Unfortunately, the caveat that all the art had to be sports based, and the fact there had to be a competition at all, meant that the art games were met with distrust from large factions of the art world.The team of Sweden at the opening ceremony of the 1912 Summer Olympics.In the first art games, Baron Pierre de Coubertin entered his peom “Ode to Sport” under the pseudonyms George Hohrod and Martin Eschbach and won the Olympic gold for literature — whether his true identity was discovered during deliberations or whether his Ode really was a gold standard we will never know.Pierre de CoubertinOver the decades, as the Olympics was becoming the behemoth that is it today, the art categories became less popular with artists who didn’t see the merit in competing and did not find any joy in creating artworks that were entirely sports-inspired.The judges did not seem overly enthusiastic about the process either, as the Smithsonian reports “the format of the competitions was inconsistent and occasionally chaotic: a category might garner a silver medal, but no gold or the jury might be so disappointed in the submissions that it awarded no medals at all.”The front gate of the Stockholm Olympic Stadium, which was built for the 1912 Games. Photo by Derbeth CC BY SA 3.0The crowds, however, seemed to love the art spectacle and would turn out in large numbers to view the entrants. At the 1932 L.A. Summer Olympics, a record 400,000 people turned out to see the art games exhibits at the Los Angeles Museum of History, Science and Art.For the 1948 Olympics, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), after much argument, voted to scrap the art based Olympic categories and replace them with a non-competition-based exhibition called the Cultural Olympiad.Pierre de Coubertin on a 2013 Russian stamp from the series “Sports Legends.”The decision meant that all 151 medals that had been awarded in the previous three decades were made void. One of the final winners of the art Olympics was John Copley of Great Britain; at the time of winning he was 73-years-old and would have been the oldest Olympian on record if his victory had been allowed to stand.The spirit of Baron Pierre de Coubertin and indeed, the spirit of the original Olympics, is remembered to this day in the IOC commissioned Sport and Art contest which is held before the start of each summer Olympics.Read another story from us: Roman Emperor Nero Competed in the OlympicsThere are no medals on the table, but entrants can win cash prizes and the chance to be exhibited in London during the Games.last_img read more

first_imgWhen Baron Pierre de Coubertin restarted the Olympics in 1896, he was adamant that it should emulate not just the physical sportsmanship of the original competition (albeit with less nudity) but should reflect what it truly meant to be an Olympian. For the baron, who was classically trained, a true Olympian was someone who was able to show prowess on the sports field and was able to hold their own when it came to artistic pursuits.Baron Pierre de Coubertin – a gold medal for literature at the 5th Summer Olympic Games, 1912 in Stockholm, for the Ode to Sport.It took the Baron almost ten years to convince the Olympic Committee to get on board with his vision for a well-rounded Olympic Games.The Baron was very much a man of conviction and declared at the time: “There is only one difference between our Olympiads and plain sporting championships, and it is precisely the contests of art as they existed in the Olympiads of Ancient Greece, where sports exhibitions walked in equality with artistic exhibitions.”Detail of unusual ancient rock wall design and pattern in Olympia, Greece where the first Olympics were held.By 1912, the Baron had successfully secured his dream and the first Olympics for art were held at the Stockholm Summer Games. There were five categories that could be entered, and all entries had to be related to sport in some way.The categories were: architecture, music, painting, sculpture and literature. The medal system worked in the same way as the physical sports with a gold, silver and bronze for each category.Cover of the official report for the 1896 Summer Olympics.Unfortunately, the caveat that all the art had to be sports based, and the fact there had to be a competition at all, meant that the art games were met with distrust from large factions of the art world.The team of Sweden at the opening ceremony of the 1912 Summer Olympics.In the first art games, Baron Pierre de Coubertin entered his peom “Ode to Sport” under the pseudonyms George Hohrod and Martin Eschbach and won the Olympic gold for literature — whether his true identity was discovered during deliberations or whether his Ode really was a gold standard we will never know.Pierre de CoubertinOver the decades, as the Olympics was becoming the behemoth that is it today, the art categories became less popular with artists who didn’t see the merit in competing and did not find any joy in creating artworks that were entirely sports-inspired.The judges did not seem overly enthusiastic about the process either, as the Smithsonian reports “the format of the competitions was inconsistent and occasionally chaotic: a category might garner a silver medal, but no gold or the jury might be so disappointed in the submissions that it awarded no medals at all.”The front gate of the Stockholm Olympic Stadium, which was built for the 1912 Games. Photo by Derbeth CC BY SA 3.0The crowds, however, seemed to love the art spectacle and would turn out in large numbers to view the entrants. At the 1932 L.A. Summer Olympics, a record 400,000 people turned out to see the art games exhibits at the Los Angeles Museum of History, Science and Art.For the 1948 Olympics, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), after much argument, voted to scrap the art based Olympic categories and replace them with a non-competition-based exhibition called the Cultural Olympiad.Pierre de Coubertin on a 2013 Russian stamp from the series “Sports Legends.”The decision meant that all 151 medals that had been awarded in the previous three decades were made void. One of the final winners of the art Olympics was John Copley of Great Britain; at the time of winning he was 73-years-old and would have been the oldest Olympian on record if his victory had been allowed to stand.The spirit of Baron Pierre de Coubertin and indeed, the spirit of the original Olympics, is remembered to this day in the IOC commissioned Sport and Art contest which is held before the start of each summer Olympics.Read another story from us: Roman Emperor Nero Competed in the OlympicsThere are no medals on the table, but entrants can win cash prizes and the chance to be exhibited in London during the Games.last_img read more

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Government Price War Pushes Mortgage Risk Up

15 Aug 2019

first_img American Enterprise Institute FHA FHFA Mortgage Risk 2015-01-27 Tory Barringer The market for federally insured home purchase mortgages grew riskier in December, garnering worry from analysts concerned about the government’s recent efforts to expand mortgage access.In its latest National Mortgage Risk Index (NMRI), the American Enterprise Institute’s (AEI) International Center on Housing Risk estimated that 11.84 percent of agency purchase loans would be at risk of default should the economy see another crisis in the near future.December’s index, which saw about 215,000 new loans added to the pool of risk-rated mortgages, was up 0.4 percentage points from the average for the prior three months and 1.1 percentage points from a year earlier, AEI said.As ever, the largest portion of risk came from the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), which had a risk index of 24.33 percent, up 0.2 percentage points from the prior three-month average.Following that were the Veterans Affairs index, which was at 11.5 percent, and the Fannie/Freddie index, which was 6.2 percent, just above the 6 percent threshold AEI says is “indicative of conditions conducive to a stable market.”The biggest ongoing problem, the group says, is the number of loans with high debt-to-income (DTI) ratios being approved. While last year’s qualified mortgage (QM) regulation restricted safe harbor status for mortgages with DTIs above 43 percent, loans qualified for purchase by the GSEs or FHA are temporarily exempt.As a result of that exemption, AEI estimates the share of loans with DTIs exceeding the QM cutoff was 23 percent over the past three months.On top of that, both FHA and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) have taken steps in the past few months to lower the financial bar for mortgage access in order to increase homeownership—a strategy AEI researchers worry will backfire.”For 50+ years, housing policy relied on looser underwriting standards in an effort to lift homeownership and the economy,” AEI said. “This effort has neither increased home ownership or reliably created wealth.”They also voiced their concerns that by taking separate steps to attract homebuyers, the government is engaging in a price war with itself.”Mortgage price wars between government agencies are particularly dangerous, since access to low-cost capital and minimal capital requirements gives those agencies the ability to continue the war for many years—all at great risk to the taxpayers,” they said. Government ‘Price War’ Pushes Mortgage Risk Up January 27, 2015 482 Views center_img in Daily Dose, Data, Featured, News Sharelast_img read more

first_img American Enterprise Institute FHA FHFA Mortgage Risk 2015-01-27 Tory Barringer The market for federally insured home purchase mortgages grew riskier in December, garnering worry from analysts concerned about the government’s recent efforts to expand mortgage access.In its latest National Mortgage Risk Index (NMRI), the American Enterprise Institute’s (AEI) International Center on Housing Risk estimated that 11.84 percent of agency purchase loans would be at risk of default should the economy see another crisis in the near future.December’s index, which saw about 215,000 new loans added to the pool of risk-rated mortgages, was up 0.4 percentage points from the average for the prior three months and 1.1 percentage points from a year earlier, AEI said.As ever, the largest portion of risk came from the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), which had a risk index of 24.33 percent, up 0.2 percentage points from the prior three-month average.Following that were the Veterans Affairs index, which was at 11.5 percent, and the Fannie/Freddie index, which was 6.2 percent, just above the 6 percent threshold AEI says is “indicative of conditions conducive to a stable market.”The biggest ongoing problem, the group says, is the number of loans with high debt-to-income (DTI) ratios being approved. While last year’s qualified mortgage (QM) regulation restricted safe harbor status for mortgages with DTIs above 43 percent, loans qualified for purchase by the GSEs or FHA are temporarily exempt.As a result of that exemption, AEI estimates the share of loans with DTIs exceeding the QM cutoff was 23 percent over the past three months.On top of that, both FHA and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) have taken steps in the past few months to lower the financial bar for mortgage access in order to increase homeownership—a strategy AEI researchers worry will backfire.”For 50+ years, housing policy relied on looser underwriting standards in an effort to lift homeownership and the economy,” AEI said. “This effort has neither increased home ownership or reliably created wealth.”They also voiced their concerns that by taking separate steps to attract homebuyers, the government is engaging in a price war with itself.”Mortgage price wars between government agencies are particularly dangerous, since access to low-cost capital and minimal capital requirements gives those agencies the ability to continue the war for many years—all at great risk to the taxpayers,” they said. Government ‘Price War’ Pushes Mortgage Risk Up January 27, 2015 482 Views center_img in Daily Dose, Data, Featured, News Sharelast_img read more

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